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Security Training & Awareness: 3 Big Myths
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cybersavior
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cybersavior,
User Rank: Strategist
10/23/2017 | 11:53:54 AM
It's not whether companies will administer InfoSec awareness training, it's when and how.
Regardless of opinions about tedious, boring and repetitive security and privacy training, it is requisite.  Most controls frameworks (some regulatory) require security awareness training for end users and to demonstrate evidence annually.  It's the same with Sexual Harrassment and Anti-Money Laundering/Insider Trading/Ethics.

Just as the pre-flight demonstration of the seat belt and oxygen masks in the aisle of the plane, infosec awareness training isn't going anywhere.  It's success is in how you administer the message.  The endeavor should be on the delivery and uptake of the concepts.  In our media-saturated society, you had better have something live-action, animated and interest-holding or as the author says, the trainees are going to hate it.  Make awareness training interesting, memorable and most of all personal.  Make it real.  Use real-world, real-workplace examples.  Above all, place the accountability on the individual for the protection of data assets.  Put teeth into your policies.  For example, where I have worked, senior leadership enforced a "three-strikes" mandate.  If a staff member was causal to a security or privacy incident or a phishing incident (synthetic or otherwise), you were out.  Now the class is listening!  Anything less and your awareness training is an annoying, box-ticking, clickthrough time-soak.
eyalbd1
50%
50%
eyalbd1,
User Rank: Strategist
10/24/2017 | 2:07:28 PM
Re: It's not whether companies will administer InfoSec awareness training, it's when and how.
I don't really disagree much with what you're saying and if you reflect on my argument you can probably see that. What we're seeing - and what i wanted to shed light on - is that there is a misguided push towards unnecessary amounts of training, despite evidence that more class times/simulations doesn't always equate to a more cyber saavy workforce.Certainly there needs to be some level of training and it should differ from organization to organization. But a lot of the narrative that's out there about how much training is needed and how much content workers should consume each month is simply not factually accurate. 
jenshadus
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50%
jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
10/30/2017 | 1:24:20 PM
Re: It's not whether companies will administer InfoSec awareness training, it's when and how.
We're doing microlearning episodes.  I find them entertaining, some find them simplistic and demeaning (I guess they want to show off their high IQ) and have complained about that.  I don't care, as long as the message is simple and obvious.  For example, don't open emails from senders you don't know.  How simple is that?  I open Darkreading emails because I know who they are.  Now, I hope the link isn't spoofed ;)
eyalbd1
100%
0%
eyalbd1,
User Rank: Strategist
10/31/2017 | 5:15:03 PM
Re: It's not whether companies will administer InfoSec awareness training, it's when and how.
I bet those microlearning episodes will stick with your colleagues, even if they do some complaining about them. Could you imagine asking them to watch long form video throughout the year? 
Joe Stanganelli
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0%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/24/2017 | 1:59:48 PM
Module oversaturation
"Instead, the oversaturation of modules frequently confuses and frustrates employees who can't see how such education benefits them."

It'd be nice if the primary and secondary education institutions in this country could also realize this.
jenshadus
50%
50%
jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
11/1/2017 | 7:25:23 AM
Re: Module oversaturation
TEll me about it.  I was SOOOOOO bored by the end of the semester.  I enjoyed the concentrate summer school terms much better.  I guess educators figure that we're all really dumb or something.  It's gotten worse I bet.


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