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Cybersecurity's 'Broken' Hiring Process
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InfoSecurityMaster
InfoSecurityMaster,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2017 | 12:36:33 PM
about The Report
Great to get the actual report.

As per my previous post, the premise is sound (IMEEHDPO).  However, from an analytical perspective, it seems to be a bit small sample.  This can and should be updated, perhaps with partnering with am Infosec organization, like ISC2, ISSA and/or ISACA.  Any of these could provide a wide and large set of security professions to interview. And ISC2 does an annual salary survey.
guypod
guypod,
User Rank: Author
10/12/2017 | 5:04:51 PM
Expanding to other teams
While hiring security professionals in a better and more diverse way is indeed critical, IMO the true key to scaling security is empowering the non security team to embrace security practices, building security in
Kelly Jackson Higgins
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
10/12/2017 | 9:49:02 AM
Re: "Broken Hiring Process"? what process?
Great insight, @InfoSecurityMaster. I especially appreciate "The Girl with the Dragon Tatoo" reference. =) 

The disconnect between traditional HR recruitment and hiring and recruitment and hiring for cybersecurity was something that was apparent in job descriptions, but to hear more about the recruitment and interviewing challenges was eye-opening. Some of these orgs are basically working around HR to find people. Really interesting stuff.
InfoSecurityMaster
InfoSecurityMaster,
User Rank: Strategist
10/12/2017 | 9:13:35 AM
"Broken Hiring Process"? what process?
The article's title presumes that there is a process.  Most recruiting, from the candidate's viewpoint, it haphazard at best.

HR generalists and recruiters are mostly not competent (not equipped, to be nice) to recruit security professionals. 

Another major problem is that positions are not properly and consistently categorized.  I can see two positions with near IDENTICAL veribiage, and when I inquire on compensation, there can be a $10k, $20k, $30k or more difference.  The detail here is that HR doesn't have context to know if they are filling a firewall admin or security/SOC analyst v filling an ISSO or Security Engineer or Security Architect (or CISO). When they realize they really want an ISSO or Security Engineer, they are going to have to up their game $25k or so. 

Part of this stems from Infosec not defining the differences between technical security (e.g. firewall) and infosec management (e.g. ISSO, CISO).  DoD has a policy defining these (by associated certifications), but I dont think that is widely known. 

My attempt to train the recuiter-seekers is to re-work my resume to list the Roles I fulfill, Qualifications and certifications, Goals and Skills. The lastly, Experience/Job list.  Word search only will get then so far; they are going to have to read my story before they get to review former employers.  You would be amazed how many interviews are not interviews - only review of former employment. Ridiculous waste of my time.  Listen to what I am telling you (I AM the Expert, after all).

Oh, and how did that HR miss the clues of "'didn't look into your eyes'" as a possible indicator of extreme competence?  Just read "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" to gain some insight. 

I can only hope this gets cross-posted to some HR/Recruiting sites.....
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