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After DHS Notice, 21 States Reveal They Were Targeted During Election
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jenshadus
jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
9/26/2017 | 10:01:00 AM
Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
There are so many things in this article that I disagree with.  I'll just point out one.

What's the evidence it was the Russians.  I went to Defcon and it took many of these people but 10 to 15 minutes to hack into the sample machines that were available.  I heard that one of them turned the booth into a PACMAN game.  Don't know if that's also true.  Virginia had one 100% red country that voted 100% blue, Maryland is notorious for sending people to vote in Virginia using fake ID's, not counting all the dead people who come in to vote (huh?). 

 
screwbird
screwbird,
User Rank: Strategist
9/26/2017 | 10:37:43 PM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
It would be nice to know how attribution was established. 
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 9:50:09 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
There are any number of fine countries to blame - North Korea and China to start with and just assuming that all BAD in the world belongs to Russian hackers is simplistic.  IP trace does not mean a tinker's damn as those can be hidden, fudged quite easily.    As for me,I personally fear hackers from Towaco, New Jerssy!!!  Now THAT is a tough area!!! LOL
jenshadus
jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
9/27/2017 | 10:42:45 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
Amen
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 11:12:37 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
There are any number of fine countries to blame - North Korea and China to start with That is true, I would add many others that have capabilities to execute an attack.
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 11:14:55 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
IP trace does not mean a tinker's damn as those can be hidden, fudged quite easily I would agree, IP address can easily be spoofed. It is not a traceable entity, there needs to be other mechanisms to track the attackers.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 7:54:34 PM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
@Dr. T: Absolutely. Reminds me of the forensics tracking that big Sony hack that was traced to North Korea...except other researchers eventually traced it to...Russia!

And even then, that location tracking may not have been accurate/the whole story. There seems to be little shortage of IP-masking tech if you know where to look (no pun intended).
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 7:58:43 PM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
FWIW, not entirely sure what NoKo's motive would have been to actually interfere (although poke around, maybe). Seems like an HRC administration would have continued the policy of patience.

But yes, points well taken.
jenshadus
jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
9/28/2017 | 8:02:16 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
Considering that anyone can buy a VPN anonymously, using a gift card that you can pay with cash, and then selecting a server from anywhere in the world, and from there buy access to another VPN using a server in another part of the world, a hacker can really objuscate the origin of the attack.  The jury is out on this one.  Media loves to follow the media.  Better yet,  the media are their own best fan.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2017 | 4:28:40 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
I wonder how the controls on gift card usage to fight back against the spam industry has impacted/is impacting this.

Also, don't forget bitcoin and altcoins as a method of anonymous payment.
jenshadus
jenshadus,
User Rank: Strategist
9/29/2017 | 7:27:34 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
Excellent question.  At the price of bitcoin, think I'll forgo that avenue.  Cash will do nicely.  But it would be interesting to see the relationship of the use of gift cards and spam.  I do have an anonymous email, and I let that box get all the spam.  I safeguard my normal personal email and work email pretty carefully.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2017 | 12:19:32 PM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
@jenshadus: Brian Krebs talks about the history of those very developments in his book, Spam Nation. Highly recommended read.
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 11:09:43 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
What's the evidence it was the Russians. Good question. There may not be a clear set of evidence. However Russians and many others have interests in attacking US systems.
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 11:11:24 AM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
Virginia using fake ID's, not counting all the dead people who come in to vote (huh?). Yes, fake ID would be another major issue for an selection system. All needs to be avoided,
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 7:57:01 PM
Re: Really? We're still pointing fingers at the Russians?
> Maryland is notorious for sending people to vote in Virginia using fake ID's

Same with MA and NH, from what I understand (NH being much different, politically, from most of New England).

And yes, you're absolutely right that voting has enough hacks and problems with it -- low- and high-tech -- with or without foreign involvement.

As I observed a few years ago, electronic voting of any kind is not and has not ever been ready for prime time. enterprisenetworkingplanet.com/netsecur/hack-early-hack-often-the-perils-of-electronic-voting.html
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/27/2017 | 11:08:09 AM
DHS is late
It is a little bit late for DHS to come out with this information, everybody knows not only Russians but may other countries try to attack other counties systems and that includes election systems too.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2017 | 12:20:32 PM
Re: DHS is late
@Dr.T: Not to mention that DHS itself was reportedly found with its hands in the cookie jar hacking a state election system...
Lepricon
Lepricon,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2017 | 7:11:06 PM
DHS reverses on at least one state
The irony is that they've already had to amend their statement:

"MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security reversed course Tuesday and told Wisconsin officials that the Russian government did not scan the state's voter registration system."

 


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