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To Be Ready for the Security Future, Pay Attention to the Security Past
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mjohnson681
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mjohnson681,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2017 | 6:45:24 PM
Redefine the Future
Why shouldn't we redefine the futrue of cybersecurity by making the data worthless for those who want to steal it?

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/give-up-cybersecurity-programs-matthew-r-johnson-cpa-cisa/ 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2017 | 11:18:25 PM
Re: Learn from History
@jcavery: We've already been seeing this in the financial services space, which used to be very anti-sharing when it came to threat intelligence. Since cybersecurity has started to be seen as a "greater good" issue impacting the entire industry and national security, many are now clamoring to join the table with each other.
jcavery
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50%
jcavery,
User Rank: Moderator
9/18/2017 | 1:22:31 PM
Re: Learn from History
Agree Joe, and any new attack methods captured by honeypots or otherwise need to be shared as soon as possible so we can benefit from the information, instead of acting reactively as you mentioned.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/18/2017 | 1:19:36 PM
Re: Learn from History
This really comes down to acting proactively instead of always running around acting reactively. Given that history repeats itself -- and many hackers tend to be lazy and recycle the same old attacks and malicious code in what can sometimes be a predictable pattern -- frameworks need to be constructed and adhered to that allow for a layered, proactive, ever-vigilant approach.
jcavery
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jcavery,
User Rank: Moderator
9/18/2017 | 11:34:23 AM
Learn from History
It will be true for computing as long as new technologies and concepts are invented. For example, quantum computing will force us to re-visit all the same problems we originally faced with the internet in its infancy. Even though it is "just" an increase in processing speed, we will still need to apply old lessons to this new capability in order to avoid all those original problems. Example: Password entropy standards will need to move. Perhaps two-factor auth will need to be looked at again as well. All of these original security solutions we have already solved in the past will need to be fresh in our minds for future changes if we are to avoid original failures. Yes, new concepts will need to be invented, however we do not want to reinvent the wheel on the road to the new concepts.


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