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Tuesday: Spammers' Favorite Day of the Week
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RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 8:15:09 AM
Work Week Driven
It's not surprising that the trend correlates with the corporate work week. A large majority of employees would not check their work email outside of the office. I wonder for commercial email domains if there is any discernable trend?
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 8:33:13 AM
Re: Work Week Driven
Don't know about commercial, but in general makes perfect sense.  Long weekends can translate into a Friday off or a Monday off, so T-W-Th are the days when maximum number of workers are IN the office doing their work.  It should not have taken IBM to mount a huge study to figure out this basic fact.  
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 8:38:09 AM
Re: Work Week Driven
Agreed around your IBM assessment. Unfortunately though, just because something seems logical doesn't mean the data will always support that. I do think resources could have been better utilized elsewhere instead of this study. Now that data confirms "Spammers' favorite day of the week", besides the fun factoid, there really won't be any difference in day to day security activities so what was the point.
xanthan99
xanthan99,
User Rank: Strategist
8/22/2017 | 9:43:48 AM
New information?
This doesn't seem like new information in terms of when Spam is sent, I could have derived this report from scanning my inbox.  In addition, even after reading the IBM source article, it isn't exactly clear what the originator information means.  Does India lead in sending Spam around the world or as the article implies, Spam tends to be sent from the target email's country of origin which would seem to infer that Indians receive more Spam than any other nationality.  And by quite a large margin.  If this is the case, given how much US offshore development is sourced from India an interesting article would be to use this data to start an examination of the state of security in the Indian Tech sector.
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 10:14:16 AM
Re: Work Week Driven
True enough - the threats are a 24-7-365 reality so this is really a puff piece.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 5:38:43 PM
Online activity
This is insightful considering that this seems to track with social-media engagement -- which, perforce, is also linked to levels of online activity. Tuesday is typically the biggest day for online engagement, in general.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 5:40:13 PM
Re: Work Week Driven
I'm not so sure about the "puffery" of it considering the evolution of increasingly more "intelligent" networks. It may, potentially, make sense one day, as we work toward true SONs (self-organized networks), to have heightened strictness of certain measures during times when the network is more prone to attack.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/22/2017 | 5:41:09 PM
Re: Work Week Driven
@Ryan: I'm curious to know some data on that. I know some people who are exactly like that -- and others who are "always on" -- checking their work email often as soon as they get up in the morning (even if it's a day off).
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2017 | 7:43:02 AM
Re: Work Week Driven
@Joe, I definitely know people like that as well. As you stated, it would be interesting to survey employees outside of work email habits.
brucebrennan
brucebrennan,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/25/2017 | 1:58:31 AM
Re: Work Week Driven
yeah
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