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Breaches Are Coming: What Game of Thrones Teaches about Cybersecurity
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Exabeam_Orion
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Exabeam_Orion,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2017 | 4:04:45 PM
Re: What GOT teaches...
@Jimmy - I agree. That's a pretty solid framework.

@ Joe - I also agree that we need more emphasis on response and remediation.  Returning to our analogy from the article...

**Spoiler alert - if you haven't watched the Season 7 finale, read no further** 

Now that part of the Wall has come down, the North is in dire need of response and recovery.

Security teams would do well to start investing in automation for the back half of the framework you laid out. Items 5 through 8 have lots of manual steps.  Automation, data science, and ML may be able to help amplify analyst post -ncident prodictiivty.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2017 | 8:49:26 PM
Re: What GOT teaches...
@jimmy: I think that too many frameworks place not enough attention on the post-incident -- response and recovery. The NIST Cybersecurity Framework particularly comes to mind, where there are far fewer aspects and standards tied to the "Respond" and "Recover" branches compared to the other three branches (Identity, Protect, and Detect). While security should be proactive over reactionary, there are always more things to do and things to learn from incidents in the post-mortem.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2017 | 8:43:02 PM
Paying attention, being prepared
Winter is coming and related GoT lessons ultimately come down to paying attention to what's happening and what's been happening -- and being prepared accordingly.

SPOILER ALERT

I wrote a similar piece recently on CIO lessons from Game of Thrones ( here: insights.hpe.com/articles/the-game-of-thrones-cio-5-lessons-of-it-and-fire-1708.html ). One of my takeaways discussed the unfortunate decision by Daenerys and Tyrion to send poorly secured Greyjoy ships with key allies to Dorne when they knew Euron was out looking for Yara and Theon Greyjoy -- resulting in, effectively, "transmission loss."

Make sure you understand your network pathways and you properly secure your transmissions and your network architecture so you too don't lose key packets. ;)
jmmyTor
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0%
jmmyTor,
User Rank: Strategist
8/17/2017 | 11:15:45 AM
Re: What GOT teaches...
As the people of the world prepared for white walkers so aslo must the CISO prepares for Cyber attacks. It will come. With the ransome demands from HBO more will come. What HBO need to do is to protect itself from more invasion or penetration into it business. They need to upgrade themselves by teaching their employee Cyber Security Educationas to protect them from further nightmares. We lives in a digital world now, where anything can be acess from anywhere in the world. It takes only a keyboard to do an irreparable damages to business and people lives. They need to create a Framework to protect from external agressions. such frameworks could be.

1. Developing a contigency plan.

2. Risks assessment 

3. Preparation

4. Detection

5. Containment

6. Eradication

7. Recovery.

8. Post incident.

 

 
jarome
0%
100%
jarome,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2017 | 9:44:23 AM
They deserved what they got
I read that the administrator passwords were stolen. Why is any enterprise still using passwords (and not one-time-password tokens)? Even ssh keys might have helped.
zzx375
100%
0%
zzx375,
User Rank: Strategist
8/14/2017 | 1:14:56 PM
What GOT teaches...
"Winter is here".


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