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60% of Infosec Execs Are Boosting SOC Deployments
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rwsmarine
50%
50%
rwsmarine,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/15/2017 | 3:02:40 PM
Cyber as a platform
I'm curious on why we're not seeing as discussed more 3rd parties offering cyber security as a platform.  If many businesses are using the cloud it would seem to be a great idea to offer cyber as well.  Tons of mom n pop shops cannot afford to hire on the security team of admins to run a full scale snoop n poop shop but the cloud providers could.  Unless of course the liability is to great
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2017 | 3:06:02 PM
Re: Combination - True
Just a short note, user education on email is of course only part of the preventative mix.  I have just departed a job with a local office, about 45 people, where every user did NOT have admin privilege on their system, ergo, cannot install non-approved software.  This was very smart - and I have since moved into a much larger firm not far away where some users DO have admin privilege and that leads to all kinds of damage.  Go figure. 
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2017 | 9:43:31 AM
Re: Coming clean
Everyone prioritizes risk based on their personal experiences. It's common.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2017 | 9:36:18 AM
Re: Combination
Agree very much on your point of user awareness being paramount. Email as a communication mechanism needs to be open by design. You can hinder the effectiveness of phishing by limiting user privileges such as local admin access. By doing so, privileges are insufficient to download anything the machine. It's not an end all mechansim but it will help immensely.
jeckhout
50%
50%
jeckhout,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/11/2017 | 9:24:06 AM
Re: Seems to be Internal
Using a third party for a SOC is attractive.  The highly skilled analysts you need to staff a SOC command high salaries and are a hot commodity today.  The problem with third a party is they never get to really learn your infrastructure, business, and user habits.  The best of both worlds might be a hybrid where your internal SOC and third party work together.  This lets you leverage both the internal and external experts for a more holistic solution.
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2017 | 8:24:16 AM
Combination
There are differences to approach these two subjects.  External threats of course come in mostly through email phishing campaigns and only a small portion of malware truly enters just on it's own.  Procedures to manage that one are well known - update, scan, keep current and monitor.  But the internal threat are realy stupid people opening up malicious emails when they SHOULD know better - here we have remediation of course but user education and rules are paramount!!!
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2017 | 6:28:01 AM
Seems to be Internal
From the article it seems this growth is internal within the company in contrast with outsourcing a SOC to a third-party vendor. There are inherent risks w/ a third-party for data compliance but once those are mitigated you will find that, operationally, utilizing a third-party SOC will boost efficiency and allow the internal security professionals to escalate critical items without being over encumbered.


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