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The Wild West of Security Post-Secondary Education
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2017 | 2:15:43 PM
Educated on the Digital Streets
I grew up in the 80s so that meant a "security" education entailed BBS chatter, the latest issue of 2600, attending a good CON (even if it was just all locals), lots of social hacking to get library time on any system they'd let you on, walking the "digital streets" and falling, getting up and learning from your mistakes.  All the while keeping in mind that what you learned one morning might need to be discarded the next and learning something new.  And above all - no formal education.  When I see the needs in the InfoSec industry now, with all its shortages, I still feel this is the best bet for young White Hat (or Grey Hat) hopefuls.  Nothing will hold back a talented hacker more than not being able to hack freely, to build and destroy penetration labs and learn from their own mistakes, or from the knowledge of the underground.  Just the fact InfoSec education right now is considered to be a "Wild West" says it all.  Artists need freedom.  Maybe InfoSec needs some non-artists in the management roles to wrangle the wet cats, but in the end, who are these certificate programs and lengthy higher education course really designed for?  The people making all the money.  Information changes by the minute.  Exploits are born and die hourly.  there is another path to education, and it will allow you to prove yourself in measurable results.  Show me the code, somebody once said.  Talk is cheap.  And ultimately the Wild West of InfoSec education is mostly talk.

       


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