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Microsoft Rolls Out AI-based Security Risk Detection Tool
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RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2017 | 1:51:22 PM
Re: Microsoft and bugs
Personally, I hate it.  The illusion of business success needs to be weighed more realistically.  You spend 250 million dollars to develop and roll out a product, "time to market" a key factor.  You make 2 billion dollars.  Your customers spend almost as much as you made paying off ransom ware that got in through your exploitable software, and your company spends again millions of dollars trying to fix the problems that could have been fixed during development; your customers move to the competition when you can't provide good service, but somehow you stay on top with other small successes that overshadow the huge failures.  I think its business practices like this that bring the whole industry down.

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2017 | 3:04:26 PM
Re: Microsoft and bugs
> A terrible way to do business given that the majority of the business world uses the Microsft Windows operating systems.

To be fair, that's probably a big part of the reason why Microsoft/Windows has such market domination. We can like the idea or hate it, but time to market is a critical factor in market success.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2017 | 3:02:17 PM
Re: Testing & Murphy's Law
@Dr.T: Well, it was a closed Coke can... ;)
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2017 | 1:29:24 PM
Re: Testing & Murphy's Law
"roll a Coke can across the keyboard"

Monkey tests. I think they will end up replacing the keyboard before cleaning all the bugs in the software.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2017 | 1:27:40 PM
Re: Testing & Murphy's Law
"... inevitably missing many of them ..."

I hear you. Sometime the only solution to make it generally available and see what other problems they face.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2017 | 1:25:55 PM
Re: Microsoft and bugs
"majority of the business world uses the Microsft Windows operating systems"

I hear you, this has changed since the mobile revolution.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2017 | 1:24:47 PM
Re: Microsoft and bugs
"bugs have been in Microsoft's DNA"

That is mainly true. It is also part of software development process I guess, not everting can be chough in the first go.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2017 | 1:22:57 PM
SRD
Anything that can check the code and let us know the vulnerabilities is a good tool we can utilize. I am wondering if it is open source or free of license to use?
Joe Stanganelli
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100%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2017 | 3:07:54 PM
Testing & Murphy's Law
This may be the way to go, considering that testing often involves anticipating all the things that can go wrong -- and inevitably missing many of them.

I'm aware of one tester whose very first test was to roll a Coke can across the keyboard. If anything locked up with that input, the developer would get their code back right then and there.
PrivateFreedoms
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50%
PrivateFreedoms,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/21/2017 | 5:17:47 PM
Microsoft and bugs
For decades bugs have been in Microsoft's DNA. Microsoft will spend 'x' amount of time on a project -- then it's forced to market as long as there are no show stopper bugs and the remaining bugs are less than 'Y %' per one thousand lines of code. A terrible way to do business given that the majority of the business world uses the Microsft Windows operating systems. Some half ass AI is only a band aid. And I suspect it will be buggy too.


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