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Hacking Factory Robot Arms for Sabotage, Fun & Profit
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/4/2017 | 10:32:44 AM
Re: Tech is Tech is Tech
@Christian: You raise excellent points -- and I don't see any of this changing as long as "first to market, first to market, first to market" remains the battle cry of global industry.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/4/2017 | 10:31:41 AM
Alternatively, violence
Alternatively, a dastardly hacker who cares less for subtlety and "the long game" could potentially hack into those big yellow robotic arms to cause massive devastation and even hurt people.

Comic book idea: Hacker introduces micro-defect, blackmails company engineer, company engineer pays up, and before company engineer can fix the problem, hacker uses IIoT hack to kill the company engineer. Rinse and repeat.
Christian Bryant
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Christian Bryant,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2017 | 12:15:42 PM
Tech is Tech is Tech
Not to get repetitive, but tech is tech is tech.  All I can say to this is that, if you make an electronic device that has parts that can "talk" to other parts, or has an interface that can be "talked" to in any way, and that device controls something, assume it can and will be hacked, cracked, etc.

Hacking {Fill in Your Product} for Sabotage, Fun & Profit should be the very first document written before a product even goes to the Testing team.  The more exploits discovered in Dev the better; putting anything out in Prod (especially manufacturing and hospital robotics) that can be hacked in this first weeks of Production use shows limited concern for the end user, the company as a whole and the industry.

As interesting as all these studies and guidelines are, they all point to the same trend.  That trend is a too-loose security and software methodology and regulatory environment that encourages - no, mandates - more aggressive product security development and risk analysis.

 

 

 


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