Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Hacking Factory Robot Arms for Sabotage, Fun & Profit
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Joe Stanganelli
0%
100%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/4/2017 | 10:32:44 AM
Re: Tech is Tech is Tech
@Christian: You raise excellent points -- and I don't see any of this changing as long as "first to market, first to market, first to market" remains the battle cry of global industry.
Joe Stanganelli
0%
100%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/4/2017 | 10:31:41 AM
Alternatively, violence
Alternatively, a dastardly hacker who cares less for subtlety and "the long game" could potentially hack into those big yellow robotic arms to cause massive devastation and even hurt people.

Comic book idea: Hacker introduces micro-defect, blackmails company engineer, company engineer pays up, and before company engineer can fix the problem, hacker uses IIoT hack to kill the company engineer. Rinse and repeat.
RetiredUser
0%
100%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2017 | 12:15:42 PM
Tech is Tech is Tech
Not to get repetitive, but tech is tech is tech.  All I can say to this is that, if you make an electronic device that has parts that can "talk" to other parts, or has an interface that can be "talked" to in any way, and that device controls something, assume it can and will be hacked, cracked, etc.

Hacking {Fill in Your Product} for Sabotage, Fun & Profit should be the very first document written before a product even goes to the Testing team.  The more exploits discovered in Dev the better; putting anything out in Prod (especially manufacturing and hospital robotics) that can be hacked in this first weeks of Production use shows limited concern for the end user, the company as a whole and the industry.

As interesting as all these studies and guidelines are, they all point to the same trend.  That trend is a too-loose security and software methodology and regulatory environment that encourages - no, mandates - more aggressive product security development and risk analysis.

 

 

 


News
Former CISA Director Chris Krebs Discusses Risk Management & Threat Intel
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/23/2021
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
Security + Fraud Protection: Your One-Two Punch Against Cyberattacks
Joshua Goldfarb, Director of Product Management at F5,  2/23/2021
News
Cybercrime Groups More Prolific, Focus on Healthcare in 2020
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  2/22/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
Building the SOC of the Future
Building the SOC of the Future
Digital transformation, cloud-focused attacks, and a worldwide pandemic. The past year has changed the way business works and the way security teams operate. There is no going back.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-21620
PUBLISHED: 2021-02-24
A cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in Jenkins Claim Plugin 2.18.1 and earlier allows attackers to change claims.
CVE-2021-21621
PUBLISHED: 2021-02-24
Jenkins Support Core Plugin 2.72 and earlier provides the serialized user authentication as part of the "About user (basic authentication details only)" information, which can include the session ID of the user creating the support bundle in some configurations.
CVE-2021-21622
PUBLISHED: 2021-02-24
Jenkins Artifact Repository Parameter Plugin 1.0.0 and earlier does not escape parameter names and descriptions, resulting in a stored cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability exploitable by attackers with Job/Configure permission.
CVE-2020-28599
PUBLISHED: 2021-02-24
A stack-based buffer overflow vulnerability exists in the import_stl.cc:import_stl() functionality of Openscad openscad-2020.12-RC2. A specially crafted STL file can lead to code execution. An attacker can provide a malicious file to trigger this vulnerability.
CVE-2020-7846
PUBLISHED: 2021-02-24
Helpcom before v10.0 contains a file download and execution vulnerability caused by storing hardcoded cryptographic key. It finally leads to a file download and execution via access to crafted web page.