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Threat Intelligence Sharing: The New Normal?
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Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
6/26/2017 | 2:39:55 PM
Re: Comment:
"a corporation doesn't want to share intimate details of attacks and vectors"

That makes sense, it is going to be hard to share the threats that the company encountered and  what they did about it. 
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
6/26/2017 | 2:38:02 PM
Threat Intelligence Sharing: The New Normal
I would like it not to be a new normal but given the situation, threat intelligence sharing would be quite helpful for the communities.
RetiredUser
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
6/24/2017 | 6:20:43 PM
Re: Comment:
I have to agree.  Coming from the healthcare industry (currently) we see great value in partnerships with other medical organizations, from pharmacy to radiology to hospitals.  By setting up "health information exchanges" (HIE) with vetted partners, we feel confident the data we exchange is mostly clean, true and of interest.  This is key for me especially since the data I share and receive is tech-related.

A similar model for threat intelligence is really crucial.  Where HIEs are trying to save lives by increasing access to health data, corporations could be saving millions/billions/trillions of dollars for their customers by keeping major corps up-to-date with exploits as they are discovered - immediate and before any other groups outside the initial penetrator(s) are aware.     
cybersavior
cybersavior,
User Rank: Strategist
6/23/2017 | 11:38:43 AM
Comment:
The hardship in "crowdsourcing" threat intelligence is this.  On one hand, a corporation doesn't want to share intimate details of attacks and vectors it has seen (and perhaps suffered from).  It's not something you advertise.  On the other hand, it's natural to want similar data from other companies to use to advantage. 

Until a dedicated exchange or forum exists (besides the existing tools that mesh subscriber detections today) that anonymizes the reporting entity sources, we won't see any real open collaboration.  The fundamental problem in this interchange model is that the closer you get to anonymity the farther you get from assurance and authenticity.  Meaning, the reliability of threat articulation from an anonymous source is less than a vetted representative from "MegaCorp, LLC" proper.  This could be overcome by a intermediate, sanctioned broker to ensure the reporting entity is genuine.

Until the exchange mechanism is sexy and "now" it won't work either.  The threat intelligence collaboration and sharing service needs to solidly be edgy social media.  Think "HackedIn" and not some cold, corporate or government offering that reads like RFC's and NIST documentation.

Until the threat intelligence interchange is highly automated, it won't be accepted.  MegaCorp is not going to dedicate service agents or ongoing labor to the contributions nor consuming content.  If the end-all solution doesn't facilitate fast-flux transactions in both directions and provide actionable output that itself can be automated, it won't be widely adopted.
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