Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
The Implications Behind Proposed Internet Privacy Rules
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Shantaram
50%
50%
Shantaram,
User Rank: Ninja
4/19/2017 | 9:11:54 AM
Re: 192.168.0.1
Very intуresting and detailed post. Thanks for sharing
dritchie
50%
50%
dritchie,
User Rank: Strategist
4/18/2017 | 3:31:53 PM
Re: Some bold claims here
Not only that, but the original poster works for a company that seems to try to help companies deliver unwanted commercial email (i.e. SPAM), so limiting the ability of providers to sell him information hurts his bottom line.
dritchie
50%
50%
dritchie,
User Rank: Strategist
4/18/2017 | 3:28:40 PM
Re: Some bold claims here
Not only that, but the poster works for a company that seems to try to help companies deliver unwanted commercial email (i.e. SPAM).
guy_montag
100%
0%
guy_montag,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/18/2017 | 11:10:24 AM
Some bold claims here
The author makes some bold claims here but doesnt make a very good case for them. Whats the FTC's track record in actually protecting privacy? How do common carrier privacy protections "stiffle antispam and malware detection" any more than TLS does? How would the FTC be less susceptible to regulatory capture than the FCC? Regultory capture is imo, the strongest case against FCC action but this article doesnt even mention it.

The only arguments here seems to be "the ftc does a great job, take my word for it" and also that adverstisers "already know everything" so who cares? That undercuts the whole part about the glories of self-regulating ISP's and the past work of the FTC. Never mind the fact that those that do deep packet inspection are ripe targets for attack even if they dont voluntarily sell the data to third parties.

The article also ignores the major impetetus for the Title II classification, namely, net neutrality. Pretending common carrier reclassification was just about privacy is silly at best, disengenuous at worst.

All in all, this article doesnt pass the laugh test. Isps are local monopolies, comcast is not google, and vpn's wont protect you. 


Look Beyond the 'Big 5' in Cyberattacks
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/25/2020
Why Vulnerable Code Is Shipped Knowingly
Chris Eng, Chief Research Officer, Veracode,  11/30/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: I think the boss is bing watching '70s TV shows again!
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-5423
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-02
CAPI (Cloud Controller) versions prior to 1.101.0 are vulnerable to a denial-of-service attack in which an unauthenticated malicious attacker can send specially-crafted YAML files to certain endpoints, causing the YAML parser to consume excessive CPU and RAM.
CVE-2020-29454
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-02
Editors/LogViewerController.cs in Umbraco through 8.9.1 allows a user to visit a logviewer endpoint even if they lack Applications.Settings access.
CVE-2020-7199
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-02
A security vulnerability has been identified in the HPE Edgeline Infrastructure Manager, also known as HPE Edgeline Infrastructure Management Software. The vulnerability could be remotely exploited to bypass remote authentication leading to execution of arbitrary commands, gaining privileged access,...
CVE-2020-14260
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-02
HCL Domino is susceptible to a Buffer Overflow vulnerability in DXL due to improper validation of user input. A successful exploit could enable an attacker to crash Domino or execute attacker-controlled code on the server system.
CVE-2020-14305
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-02
An out-of-bounds memory write flaw was found in how the Linux kernel’s Voice Over IP H.323 connection tracking functionality handled connections on ipv6 port 1720. This flaw allows an unauthenticated remote user to crash the system, causing a denial of service. The highest threat ...