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More than Half of Security Pros Rarely Change their Social Network Passwords
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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/7/2017 | 1:23:49 PM
Red Herring
This is a red herring issue, I strongly suspect.

Talk to most die-hard security pros -- the really good ones, and the ones who do nothing OTHER than cybersecurity for a living -- and their use of social networks is minimal (if not non-existent).  Moreover, they put minimal -- if any -- true PII on those social networks.  So their risk is already quite small.

Moreover, it is becoming increasingly the viewpoint of the top InfoSec pros and punditry that changing passwords frequently is NOT a best practice -- and can actually be detrimental.

The study may be headline grabbing, but I am unconcerned.
AndrewfOP
AndrewfOP,
User Rank: Moderator
4/4/2017 | 1:13:36 PM
Problematic Password Practice Advice
Clearly, if security pros can't follow their own advice, it just means the advice itself was problematic.  Secure IT policy should be clear and easy to follow, otherwise IT/Security team is obviously not doing, or not able to do its job.  One account with periodic password change is difficult enough.  Keeping good tracks of multiple accounts as with most of office working environment is practically impossible. 

Single sign-on/ password vaults, or one single password for all accounts, essentially presents the same security weak point.  The only way to maintain the good security should be user behavior tracking and analysis: any excessive access entries outside of users' normal work environment, excessive access outside normal work hours or excessive amount of access entries are potential breaches to look out for.

Continued reliance on difficult to follow password practices would only weaken IT security in the long run regardless of any potential technology that could replace passwords.
lakers85
lakers85,
User Rank: Strategist
4/3/2017 | 12:42:39 PM
Password Vaults
Any recomendations on Password Vaults? What if they are breached? Who watches the watchers?
Breezcar
Breezcar,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2017 | 11:14:58 AM
I agree
I should change more often also


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