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The Business of Security: How your Organization Is Changing beneath You
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DavidW723
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DavidW723,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2017 | 4:48:50 AM
Socialising security
Back in the early days, IT was carried out by a bunch of mystical creatures hidden away in darkened basements who spoke in strange languages and only suffered the presence of end users as a last resort. Requirements were passed through a hole in the wall and the results lobbed back months or years later. This mystique helped to spead the myth of IT being something that only the select few could participate in. 

In the intervening years that mystique has been largely blown away and now pretty much anyone can create very sophisticated systems without having to refer to the IT wizards. 

I've long felt that many IS professionals act like the old IT mystics, with whispered references to VPNs, TLS, 2048 bit keys, SOCS, SIEMS and heaven knowns what else, all in an attempt to make it seem more difficult than it actually is. 

In the same way as IT has been democratised and made avaialble to all, we need to move IS out of the central mystics and into the mainstream business areas. The data belong to the business, the risk should be owned by the business but for some reason we still seem to try to put blockers in the way of the business taking effective ownership of their security. 

That won't remove the need for IS professionals any more than putting IT into the hands of the business removed the need for IT professionals, but it will have the dual advantages of spreading security across the business, and allowing the IS Professionals to focus on new, interesting, stuff and not get bogged down in another round of Security 101 briefings. 


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