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Phishing Your Employees for Schooling & Security
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/28/2017 | 7:42:11 PM
Re: Training is the Fiction
Certainly, if humans never change behaviors, then cybersecurity is doomed.

Getting people to change behavior can be hard.  But, often enough, it can be done.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/28/2017 | 7:41:01 PM
Re: Beyond Training: The second part of Anti-Phishing
I recently interviewed somebody who discussed this very point in terms of lingering cloud FUD -- and how that FUD has largely (not entirely, but largely) shifted from fears about actual infrastructure issues to fears about stupid users doing stupid things.

But, of course, that can happen in any environment.
CNACHREINER981
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CNACHREINER981,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2017 | 2:25:48 PM
Re: Training is the Fiction
That seems an overly cynical opinion to me. I absolutely agree that changing behavior is hard... and there are certainly many old adages about old dogs not learning new tricks, etc... but humans can and do change their behaviors. There is scientific evidence for it. Anyway, I think this is an interesting read:

http://www.cognitivepolicyworks.com/blog/2010/08/21/5-things-youll-need-to-know-to-change-human-behavior/
orenfalkowitz
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orenfalkowitz,
User Rank: Strategist
3/24/2017 | 2:01:11 PM
Re: Training is the Fiction
Humans do amazing things, changing their behavior isn't one of them and its not a strategy for cybersecurity. 

Cybersecurity isn't even in the top 100 of things we've already done, with less sophisticated tools, mind you, that are far harder. 
CNACHREINER981
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CNACHREINER981,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2017 | 1:54:03 PM
Re: Training is the Fiction
I do not agree with this, and for almost the same reason you argue against user training.

I agree that users never are or will be perfect, and we can't expect them to be.... but the same can be said of technologies. I have not seen a technology that perfectly captures all the spear phishing and spam out there. Even the best products, which successfully stop or recognize 99% of the crap, still miss. More importantly, the adversary tunes to this and evades the technologies. 

Driving school doesn't stop all accidents, but you would have MANY more without it. 

To me, you need to combine technology and training to get the best statistical advantage. Neither will catch or stop everything, but combined, you'll statistically reduce misses and failures to a much smaller number. 

No solution is perfect. The real question is how you can minimize your incidents to the bare minumum. I argue that technology alone won't get you there, and I have seen other studies (some linked) showing training does lower incidents to. The best solution is a hybrid of the two, ignoring training will increase your incidents. 
orenfalkowitz
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orenfalkowitz,
User Rank: Strategist
3/24/2017 | 1:46:48 PM
Training is the Fiction
Expecting users to be perfect isn't a solution, we don't have that expectation of surgeons nor would we expect them to have an equal level of training that they receive for cybersecurity. 

We know that training whether traffic school or sex education has a limited impact in changing outcomes. 

95% of data breaches begin with phishing. The solution is technology that preempts attacks and takes advantage of weaknesses in the attackers delivery of phishing campaigns, not solutions that react and don't change the rsults we're seeing today.

 

 

 

 
CNACHREINER981
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CNACHREINER981,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2017 | 1:46:41 PM
Re: 192.168.0.1
Thank you! ^_^
CNACHREINER981
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CNACHREINER981,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2017 | 1:28:36 PM
Re: Beyond Training: The second part of Anti-Phishing
Yes. The ideal combination is technologies that can block the obviously bad stuff, other technologies that can help "advise" human choice (as you suggest), and training and user awareness. I definitely agree you need technologies to just block as much as you can, irregardless of the human. I do feel that even the best technologies aren't infallible, so training is still important. I do really love the idea of emails being visually flagged then they fail certain checks that could make them "suspicious" this technology assist really could help the user in making a decision with even more info.
DonT183
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DonT183,
User Rank: Black Belt
3/24/2017 | 1:24:00 PM
Beyond Training: The second part of Anti-Phishing
Beyond expecting staff not to respond to Phishing we need to inspect that ability.  Learning approaches for Staff is an excellent idea.  Inspection needs to go further to advise human choice.  Know where your email came from and who sent it.  All email that did not come form a digitally signed email server should be flagged as from an untrusted email server.  All email that did not come digitally signed by the sender should be flagged as from an uncertian email sender.  Add this advice to trained staff and Phishing should get much harder to do.

 
Shantaram
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Shantaram,
User Rank: Ninja
3/24/2017 | 12:13:41 PM
Re: 192.168.0.1
Thanks, article is very detailed and intersting written!
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