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Why Identity Has Become A Top Concern For CSOs
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UnHackable.Rocks
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UnHackable.Rocks,
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6/25/2017 | 4:10:46 PM
Unicorn UnHackable Servers... 1 Group of them UnHacked since 1999. Hows your Record?
Subject line says it all.  UnHackable.Rocks
MattS054
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MattS054,
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2/14/2017 | 4:41:24 PM
The Much Needed Evolution of IP
The protocol we're using today to power global commerce over the Internet was developed almost 50 years ago. Development efforts in the late 1960s and early 1970s created the TCP/IP protocol, which was originally designed to allow smaller local networks to communicate between short distances in ways they had never before. However at the time of its inception, reliability was the only concern as the idea of security was a man with a machine gun guarding the facility. Despite being an incredible development, as a result we are left with a protocol that is incredibly reliable, yet inherently unsecure as trusted identities was not part of the design. This has led to today's environment, where components are bolted-on for security, rather than baked in from the start. And given the number of data breaches we see in the headlines, we can all see how that's working out.

The time has more than come to re-evaluate the Gremlin of Internet protocols, TCP/IP. The Internet Engineering Task Force recently approved a standard-track network security protocol: The Host Identity Protocol, which many in the IETF community recognize as the next big change in IP-architecture. The protocol has been under development for nearly 20 years, in coordination with standards bodies, as well as many large corporations (Verizon, Ericson, Yokogawa, etc.).

HIP is an alternative encryption technology that was first deployed within the defense and aerospace industry, where nation-state attacks occur every hour. Specifically designed to be secure by default, HIP shifts the network trust model completely, by introducing trusted cryptographic identities within any network.


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CVE-2021-32552
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the openjdk-16 package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32553
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the openjdk-17 package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32554
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the xorg package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32555
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that read_file() in apport/hookutils.py would follow symbolic links or open FIFOs. When this function is used by the xorg-hwe-18.04 package apport hooks, it could expose private data to other local users.
CVE-2021-32556
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-12
It was discovered that the get_modified_conffiles() function in backends/packaging-apt-dpkg.py allowed injecting modified package names in a manner that would confuse the dpkg(1) call.