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Malware Used In DNC Breach Found Tracking Ukraine Military
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IWcomment
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IWcomment,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/4/2017 | 1:10:00 PM
Re: CrowdStrike Conclusions from Forensics Findings
It is pointless to throw around your CISSP numbers when they cannot be verified. If you care to throw your last names out there I will verify them, but that would be illadvised. Otherwise, just keep your CISSPs in your pockets.
Crypt0L0cker
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Crypt0L0cker,
User Rank: Strategist
1/3/2017 | 11:36:21 AM
Re: Cryptolocker decryption tool
Losses over 80% of D-30 howitzers - are numbers from Russian propaganda websites, which is definitely not an "open source reporting". When you manipulate with figures in this way people can have big doubts about the rest in the report.
BruceR279
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50%
BruceR279,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/29/2016 | 11:41:02 AM
Re: CrowdStrike Conclusions from Forensics Findings
@DMBA - since I am actively engaged in on-going security incident response efforts for one of the largest electric and gas utilities in the U.S., my comments questioning the report conclusions of CrowdStrike stand. When CrowdStrike - specifically, Dmitri Alperovitch - update the findings and conclusions of their report, I would be glad to adjust my current questioning of those conclusions. I would also be more then willing to enter into any direct discussions with either Dmitri, CrowdStrike, or any other party looking to discuss this highly important topic.

 

Alternately, as is done in any comprehensive incident response exercise impacting on matters of U.S. National security, I would highly advise the findings of CrowdStrike be made available to a broader community of cyber intelligence organizations, both public and private, for thorough scrutiny and analysis. Such an approach to forensics and intelligence analysis is a NIST 800-150 and ISO 27037 best practice.
dmba
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50%
dmba,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/29/2016 | 10:32:14 AM
Re: CrowdStrike Conclusions from Forensics Findings
@ BruceR279, "as a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (#351086)".... Please allow the real intrusion and incident response experts do their job. Thank you.
benn3012
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0%
benn3012,
User Rank: Strategist
12/29/2016 | 10:17:36 AM
Although How may be common, Who relates to Why
Our expectations are shaped by our experience and given the straitjacket that the national security apparatus places on technical development in the US the idea that this is ordered up by a monolithic government may be a logical conclusion. But in a less free society where the security apparatus relies on personal fear as its restraints it is quite possible that malware as a service is a viable industry and the orders come from a variety of sources.
BruceR279
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BruceR279,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/29/2016 | 8:07:04 AM
CrowdStrike Conclusions from Forensics Findings
The conclusion of CrowdStrike derived from their forensics findings of the work they performed for the DNC are overly stated. The conclusion is that clear ad obvious signs of malware campaign signatures attributable to two threat actors - FancyBear and CozyBear - require further scrutiny. Mandatory audit steps which need to be performed by an independent forensics auditor include identifying and enumerating every instance of the malware signature that CrowdStrike researchers are using as the direct attribution to FancyBear and CozyBear. I.e. a listing of every other threat agent that has also used the malware campaign signatures that CorwdStrike detected. This is, frankly, very basic foresnics analysis that is completely lacking in the CrowdStrike reports and throws significant flags and clouds over the efficacy of the CrowdStrike work.

Also lacking in the CrowdStrike report is a thorough discussion of the inadequate if not completely missing basic cyber security protections and controls on the DNC systems which left those systems completely exposed to not only direct human-to-machine encroachments but, even more importantly, bot-net cyber encroachment campaigns that would make direct attribution to any specific threat agent quite tenuous.

My comments here should not be construed as indicating that I reject the attribution claims to FancyBear and/or CozyBear made in the CrowdStrike report. Rather, as a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (#351086), I am concerned about the professionalism of their report which does not include analysis of probabilities of attributions to other known threat actors or threat mechanisms.


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