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Major Cyberattacks On Healthcare Grew 63% In 2016
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haemorrhoiden-selbst-behandeln
50%
50%
haemorrhoiden-selbst-behandeln,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2017 | 6:42:03 AM
security issue
Healtcare IT departments often lags on security. Last year randsomware attacks showed the weakness and IT-admins got some homework to do. Hopefully it will not happen again in this dimension.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/28/2016 | 11:56:22 AM
Attacking healthcare
"Article mentioned "people wouldn't want to attack a healthcare facility because they didn't believe anyone would want to do harm to the patients"

We know that is not the case, patients are people, and they want to attack anything they can including people.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/28/2016 | 11:55:51 AM
Re: Hacking Healthcare
"your EHR usage and allocate that to beefing up both your software/network and personnel/building security practices."

Another good point. Sometimes it is not the system everything else around it. Gmail is quite secure with two factor authentication and yet we see they are able to hack Gmail account.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/28/2016 | 11:52:00 AM
hospitals unaware of breaches
Hospitals are unaware of breaches and as many other organizations, remember Yahoo, they told us they were hacked a few years earlier. Damage may be worse if we do not know early enough
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/28/2016 | 11:51:31 AM
Re: Hacking Healthcare
"A good social engineer only needs to get a malware USB plugged into one or two devices to have access to the hospital network. "

Good point. As we know we will all take the USB drive we found in the parking lot and plug in the computers to see what is inside. 
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/28/2016 | 11:49:07 AM
Ransomware and healthcare data
As article stated hackers target healthcare because organizations will usually pay ransom for patient data simply because the alternative is more costly. They will pay and may not even reveal that there was ransomware attack.
Techgmyth
50%
50%
Techgmyth,
User Rank: Strategist
12/23/2016 | 4:51:16 PM
Microsoft Professional Support
This is really a nice post. Thanks for sharing this to us !
RetiredUser
100%
0%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
12/22/2016 | 7:09:40 PM
Hacking Healthcare
There are a couple different mindsets that need to change here.  The first is that idea of some of the smaller healthcare organizations (mostly individual practices) that hackers aren't interested in hurting patients.  Technically most aren't, but it isn't anything to do with their well-being anyway, but more to do with their personal information.  Once healthcare practices understand that data is used to create new identities, obtain credit cards and used for insurance fraud, they'll realize that by setting up more secure practices they are directly impacting their patients in a positive way. 

The other mindset that needs to change is how larger organizations (the Cedars and Kaisers of the world) deal with drug and device vendors.  These people come and go, sometimes getting into patient care areas, with access to medical devices on the floor.  A good social engineer only needs to get a malware USB plugged into one or two devices to have access to the hospital network.  Even easier, convincing a young intern to plug in a USB and "print something" for them will do the trick, too. 

Some of the larger hospitals are now implementing large Electronic Health Records that require various levels of security even to run properly so that's a plus on one hand, but on the other hand the distraction of large implementations can cover up the low-tech hacks that never get old, and never go away.  Let's take some of that money you're now earning from the governement, folks, for your EHR usage and allocate that to beefing up both your software/network and personnel/building security practices. 


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