Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Avalanche Botnet Comes Tumbling Down In Largest-Ever Sinkholing Operation
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Crypt0L0cker
50%
50%
Crypt0L0cker,
User Rank: Strategist
12/5/2016 | 5:06:12 AM
Re: Crypt0L0cker
And as I can see from his driver license (probably fake, but anyway) his origin is Russia.
Nanireko
50%
50%
Nanireko,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/5/2016 | 3:38:21 AM
Avalanche
I do see fewer spam messages with malicious attachments this December. It looks like this operation was really successful. Does anybody else see the decrease in spam emails these days?
kbannan100
50%
50%
kbannan100,
User Rank: Moderator
12/4/2016 | 8:53:51 PM
Re: How Serious a Blow?
Totally agree! If they are truly out of the picture a new gang of criminals is going to pop up -- and soon. If they haven't already! And there are still some pretty nasty malware instances out there. (For instance, the one that took down Dyn using the IoT devices. Read more about that here: bit.ly/2ewIBtW)



People are going to need to be more careful and concentrate on shoring up network security and endpoints -- everything from printers to thermostats to mobile devices.


--Karen Bannan for IDG and HP
ClaireEllison
50%
50%
ClaireEllison,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/4/2016 | 3:52:44 PM
Re: Industry
Excellent article plus its information and I positively bookmark to this site because here I always get an amazing knowledge as I expect.
francois999
50%
50%
francois999,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/4/2016 | 1:47:07 PM
Thank you for the info
I really thank you for the valuable info on this great subject and look forward to more great posts. Thanks a lot for enjoying this beauty article with me. I am appreciating it very much! Looking forward to another great article. Good.

FRANCOIS
Dan Euritt
50%
50%
Dan Euritt,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/4/2016 | 11:13:14 AM
It surely must have helped, but...
Only five people stealing millions of dollars? I wonder how many criminals got away.

Thanks for the article.
Crypt0L0cker
100%
0%
Crypt0L0cker,
User Rank: Strategist
12/2/2016 | 2:01:33 PM
Re: How Serious a Blow?
I guess it's pretty serious  - they got organiser, Hennadiy Kapkanov. He was armed with Kalashnikov, dangerous and had different shoes :)
RetiredUser
50%
50%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
12/2/2016 | 3:55:28 AM
How Serious a Blow?
I have to wonder if the blow dealt was as serious as reported.  Don't get me wrong, this is a successful operation regardless and sets the stage for future ones (which there will have to be).  But Avalanche isn't just a small group and when it went "quiet" we were probably watching evolution, not the disappearance of the syndicate; this botnet may even have been an acceptable loss.  What should be happening now is the analysis of the infrastructure to understand how Avalanche evolved and into what.  You don't accomplish as much as this syndicate did and simply go belly up after a raid like this.  It's also worth noting timelines in terms of how many years this threat existed before this large raid hit.  Something's wrong with your security offensive procedures when you're stuck with a series of "legal" raids that either go nowhere or pull small fish from the pond, and you need to pull together a global task force to get anywhere ("legally").  We just can't assume the threat is completely contained from this group.     


For Cybersecurity to Be Proactive, Terrains Must Be Mapped
Craig Harber, Chief Technology Officer at Fidelis Cybersecurity,  10/8/2019
A Realistic Threat Model for the Masses
Lysa Myers, Security Researcher, ESET,  10/9/2019
USB Drive Security Still Lags
Dark Reading Staff 10/9/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
2019 Online Malware and Threats
2019 Online Malware and Threats
As cyberattacks become more frequent and more sophisticated, enterprise security teams are under unprecedented pressure to respond. Is your organization ready?
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-17545
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-14
GDAL through 3.0.1 has a poolDestroy double free in OGRExpatRealloc in ogr/ogr_expat.cpp when the 10MB threshold is exceeded.
CVE-2019-17546
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-14
tif_getimage.c in LibTIFF through 4.0.10, as used in GDAL through 3.0.1 and other products, has an integer overflow that potentially causes a heap-based buffer overflow via a crafted RGBA image, related to a "Negative-size-param" condition.
CVE-2019-17547
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-14
In ImageMagick before 7.0.8-62, TraceBezier in MagickCore/draw.c has a use-after-free.
CVE-2019-17501
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-14
Centreon 19.04 allows attackers to execute arbitrary OS commands via the Command Line field of main.php?p=60807&type=4 (aka the Configuration > Commands > Discovery screen).
CVE-2019-17539
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-14
In FFmpeg before 4.2, avcodec_open2 in libavcodec/utils.c allows a NULL pointer dereference and possibly unspecified other impact when there is no valid close function pointer.