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Ransomware Surveys Fill In Scope, Scale of Extortion Epidemic
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ClaireEllison
ClaireEllison,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2016 | 4:20:42 PM
Re: Iamazing
Excellent article plus its information 
ClaireEllison
ClaireEllison,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2016 | 4:17:38 PM
Re: amazing
Excellent article plus its information and I positively bookmark to this site because here I always get an amazing knowledge as I expect.
T Sweeney
T Sweeney,
User Rank: Moderator
11/21/2016 | 10:45:49 AM
Re: Ransomware defense strategy
Thanks for your post, BPID... we hear this same refrain with each new threat type that emerges: Vendors can fix this in software without involving the user. And yet here we are again!

I'd welcome better insight as to what happens on the vendor or developer side. Is ransomware prevention just one more thing in the OS security equivalent of whack-a-mole? Do vendors only see costs that they won't recoup?
BPID Security
BPID Security,
User Rank: Strategist
11/21/2016 | 10:10:36 AM
Ransomware defense strategy
The concept of ransomeware is insidious, not just that it encrypts but that it can be forwarded via email to all your email recipients.

That being stipulated, it should be rather easy to have the OS, or any OS, monitor activities for encryption and notify users of questionably nefarious activities.

Online game makers have long ago created CPU process monitors to prevent realtime game 'cheating'.

The function is simple to understand, monitor for encryption code running in the cpu rather than the contents of an executale. Then stop it unless the user permits. Otherwise send it to AV for cleanup. Building it is a bit more complex as was the one my firm built for a client. Really the CPU resources and disk activity of full disk encryption is really easy to detect.

Ransomware exists because we make computers with an interface non technical people can use, It wouldn't live very long in a command line OS. Holding users responsible for their failures just adds more stuff people will ignore. It is the responsibility of the service, software or vendor to protect the user.

As an analogy: If you rent a hotel room for a night, go to dinner and your door doesn't lock, and someone comes in and spray paints the room and your possessions, who is ultmately responsible for the loss? You as temporary rentor of the service, or the security of the hotel?

We need legislation to clearly identify responsibility and the limits of that responsibility.

Still, it is a problem that technology created, one that is beyond the technical expertise of most users, and one that is solvable through intelligent technology.
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