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How Clinton, Trump Could Champion Cybersecurity
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macker490
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macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
10/28/2016 | 6:51:10 AM
Cybersecurity as an Economic Problem
we need to view cybersecurity as an economic problem -- not as a technical one.

Bruce Schneier has also mentioned this.

as long as its cheaper to skip over security than to tie things down OEMs will continue to neglect -- yes I said NEGLECT -- security requirements -- and the customers will continue to suffer the consequences.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/28/2016 | 11:12:55 AM
Re: Cybersecurity as an Economic Problem
@macker: You are exactly right.  Indeed, CISOs and others who work with InfoSec in their organizations have seen success internally by presenting cybersecurity and data privacy as issues of bottom-line issues of product/service quality.

Accordingly, so too should we think of cybersecurity and data privacy in the public sector.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/28/2016 | 11:31:21 AM
Russian boogeymen.
> "But we will defend the citizens of this country, and the Russians need to understand that."

I'm getting pretty tired of this setting the Russians up as the strawman.  There is slim evidence at best (see, e.g., PBS Newshour's piece here: pbs.org/newshour/rundown/does-government-know-hacked-emails/ ) that Clinton's emails were hacked/leaked by a Russian -- and even if that was the case, there's a big difference between "a Russian" and "the Russians."  Russia has a LOT of hackers.  Not all of them work for Vladimir Putin.

Moreover, while Russia has certainly been protective, to a certain degree, of its cybercriminals, China as a whole is FAR more guilty of malevolently cyber-attacking US interests.  But where is the crying out against China here?

And what about Romania -- which is home to one of the phishing/hacking capitals of the world?  Or North Korea?  Or Iran?  Or Syria?

"The Russians," however, are easy boogeymen (or, if you prefer, bogeymen).  They long have been.  It's all political posturing (1) for the campaign, and (2) about who gets to do what in the Ukraine.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
10/28/2016 | 11:32:58 AM
Re: Cybersecurity as an Economic Problem
Great point about the economic realities of this, @macker490. What types of economic pressures would make sense, do you think?
macker490
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macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2016 | 8:21:08 AM
Re: Cybersecurity as an Economic Problem
thanks, Kelly--

we face a Thorny Problem -- but, like most Thorny Problems, I think we can get at it by breaking it down into its components: OEM and Developers should be responsible for elements over which they have control.

Authentication is a key element -- which often doesn't get attention.   For example, if I download a Compiler and Library -- I really should satisfy myself that I have an authentic copy -- before putting it inservice.

this can be done by using PGP signatures, SHA-256 checksums -- and the like.   It's a bit of additional effort but to work with software, or firmware, -- or even e/mails, electronic 1040s, or EFT systems -- authentication is CRITICAL.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2016 | 4:37:20 PM
Re: Cybersecurity as an Economic Problem
@macker: Indeed.  Too many people think encryption is the ultimate answer -- but encryption by itself usually isn't much of a solution (especially if the data is not encrypted at rest -- because hackers are ultimately getting inside access), and systems still get compromised with encryption.  Certificates and keys and other authentication methods are important...but so too with making sure the certificates/keys/authentication haven't been compromised themselves.  (Case in point: Aruba getting negative press earlier this year for using certificates that were known to be compromised.)
macker490
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macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2016 | 8:13:03 AM
Authentication as an Administrative Problem
i think it is important to recognize that authentication is an administrative problem -- not a technical one.

example: if i want to sign my Tax return forms 1040 how does Intuit and then the IRS come to obtain a copy of my public key and verify it as authentic?

this is an administrative problem.  we have the technology but can we find the imperative to proceed?

hacking keeps getting worse; when is "enough is enough" ?
jcavery
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jcavery,
User Rank: Moderator
10/31/2016 | 2:02:37 PM
Re: Authentication as an Administrative Problem
I think we have passed the "enough is enough" point already long ago, the problem is the same with cops and robbers, or crime in general. It won't ever end, we just have to do "the best we can" to improve the situation, to get as close to 100% as we can, as often as we can, and I think we are on that track technically speaking, @macker but you're absolutely right about the economic and budget decisions being made that are holding us back from progressing at our full potential. Hackers and bad guys don't have the same budget or legal restrictions, so it costs nothing to take a chance on a new hack, and move onto another one, yet the good guys have to spend the money and be sure the defenses work every single time, all the time.
macker490
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macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
11/1/2016 | 7:57:16 AM
beyond "Enough is Enough"
an essay on The Register this morning reports computers having been attacked in the medical NHS system:

disrupting DYN was, as the British would say "a damn nuisance".    messing with medical systems is beyond that.

I agree:    we are beyond "enough is enough".

in looking at responsibility I think we should focus on the idea that every "stakeholder" should take responsibility for that part of security that he/she has control over.

for example: if I'm going to install "System X" -- I need to check the SHA-256 checksums for the components from the vendor that I am going to install;   by providng these checksums the vendor warrants that he/she has not introduced anything improper and takes responsibility for his/her own work;

The vendor/developer will have used various compilers and libraries in developing his product -- and as a developer or distributor  he is reponnsible for checking the check-sums on the tools he/she uses for development;
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
11/2/2016 | 6:10:29 AM
Re: Authentication as an Administrative Problem
> this is an administrative problem.  we have the technology but can we find the imperative to proceed?

Fair points, but through this lens, almost every security problem is an administrative problem.
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