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The Real Reasons Why Users Stink At Passwords
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jfontana
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jfontana,
User Rank: Author
9/7/2018 | 7:25:49 PM
Two-years on and this story still relevant
This is why authentication is getting a facelift.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2016 | 3:17:52 PM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
I very much agree. I'm thinking this cost pertains more to the laptop, desktop, and server environments. Mobile phones have evolved to the point where touch is the major interface point, making fingerprinting a logical premise. Laptops and other devices outside of the handheld realm haven't been as quick to make that transition. Now with the laptops being touch screen on many of the newer models I can definitely see an integration in the near future. The main question is, on devices that don't have this consistent touch interface what is the cost to create a biometric interface?
T Sweeney
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T Sweeney,
User Rank: Moderator
9/30/2016 | 12:31:18 PM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
I hear you on the issue of cost and multi-factor authentication, RyanSepe. Still, smartphone makers have been able to incorporate fingerprint technology into their gear without any apparent increase in the cost of the phones. So it leaves me wondering, how hard (okay, expensive) can it really be?
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2016 | 9:24:11 AM
Re: Changing password often
I would think the potential benefit is random when changing passwords. Meaning if someone is trying to bruteforce it either via dictionary or rainbow tables if you change to a password that was previously attempted then the security principle of changes passwords benefited you. If not, then your password is just a new password that has yet to be attempted.

Can you elaborate to how changing passwords would have a negative effect? Not sure how that plays out. Thanks,
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2016 | 9:21:54 AM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
Yes depending on your method of biometrics privacy concerns are relevant. IE retina scans can identify potential health issues which is private information.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2016 | 9:19:47 AM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
Yes there needs to be consistency. I believe there are laptops that open via fingerprint I am just not sure as to the efficacy of that mechanism for laptops.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2016 | 6:12:29 PM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
"... fingerprint ..." For some reason fingerprints do not pickup on other devices other than mobile phones. I always use it on my iPhone but not on my laptop. It needs to be stable and easy to use across devices.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2016 | 6:09:34 PM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
"... additional parameter is cost ..." Agree. There is cost and there is privacy issues in the alternative solutions. Our DNA clearly indnetifies us uniquelly, of course we are not allowed to use it.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2016 | 6:06:39 PM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
"... the human factor ..." Agree. We want things that are simple and not forcing us to remember things in our busy daily lives.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2016 | 6:04:33 PM
Re: Passwords and user behavior
"... Awareness and training will help marginally, ..." Mainly agree but password being the credentialing is a main problem. Not secure by nature.
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