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How You Can Support InfoSec Diversity, Starting With The Colleagues You Already Have
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TheSeekerThinker Searcher
50%
50%
TheSeekerThinker Searcher,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/4/2017 | 2:14:03 PM
Re: Here is how you decide who to hire
Thats the way its supposed to be but, we all know that is not the way it is.
JeffM787
100%
0%
JeffM787,
User Rank: Strategist
9/23/2016 | 6:52:30 PM
I don't understand the stated mission
"and how a predominately white and male infosec industry -- and each individual in it -- can better support women and people of color

Is the responsibility of the "infosec industry" to "support women and people of color", or should the infosec industry SUPPORT security in all of its dimensions for its stakeholders? 

It's wonderful to have an inspiring story to raise awareness and reach out to all people who can potentially strengthen the vast areas related security, but people will ultimately invest their greatest effort in what they are passionate about.  Of all professions, information security needs to attract people who are both passionate and proficient. Given the long history and number of movies, global news events, and direct relationships to technology - it's hard to imagine that anyone who's passionate about this topic needs some type of specialized outreach to get their participation.
syntax_attack
100%
0%
syntax_attack,
User Rank: Strategist
9/23/2016 | 12:08:20 PM
Here is how you decide who to hire
Hire based upon merit and merit alone.  Pick the person with the best qualifications for the position you are hiring for and leave it at that. 


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