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Snowden: Hollywood Highlights 2 Persistent Privacy Threats
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Souheil.M
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Souheil.M,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/23/2016 | 11:14:50 AM
A good read on Snowden case !
I hope this film will be providing a real opportunity for Snwoden to be pardoned and more comprehension of what he has done !

Anyway, this article is a good point to explain that we can't sacrifce our own privacy in the name of whatever reason !. In addition, I think this kind of intelligence practice will very likely continue to exist...
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 10:40:45 AM
Re: A good read on Snowden case !
Frankly, I don't know enough to ask for his pardon, which is why I will not sign any petitions requesting it.  Specifically, I don't know what damage he has done to our defense, intelligence, or diplomatic efforts, if any; I don't know what information he has given to the Russian authorities, if any (he denies that he has, but I can't imagine President Putin granting him asylum without his having been thoroughly interrogated by a couple of the FSB's finest); and I don't know what there is in the cache that hasn't been publicly reported (and there really isn't any way to secure what is still in Glenn Greenwald's custody).  Admittedly, he has exposed real abuses and provoked a badly needed public debate, but we, the general public have no good way of knowing what the downside was.

If I were President, I wouldn't even think about granting him a pardon until/unless I had a very good idea of what the negative consequences were, and unless the entire contents of the cache were transmitted to the National Security Council staff (so I and the appropriate agencies would know exactly what was leaked, not just what Greenwald has chosen to release).  Then I'd need to have some very long conversations with my Secretaries of State, Defense, and Homeland Security; and with my Director of National Intelligence and probably a remote conversation with Snowden as well (he could be granted safe conduct to and from the US Embassy in Moscow for that purpose).  Only then do I think I would have enough information to make a decision.

In the mean time, I prefer to withhold judgment.  I don't really like deferring to the President, but I don't see much of a choice.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 5:07:37 PM
Re: A good read on Snowden case !
"... he general public have no good way of knowing what the downside was. ..."

Agree. We are only hearing what is reported. We do not understand the dynamics I believe.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 5:01:31 PM
Re: A good read on Snowden case !
"... we can't sacrifice our own privacy ..."

I hear you. Privacy will likely be less of an issue in near future, we already give up privacy by being in the Facebook and when we start using tools available to us, more like security is the main concern.
Souheil.M
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Souheil.M,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/26/2016 | 6:24:51 AM
Re: A good read on Snowden case !
Yes you're right.  However, I would say when using social media networks you are giving them some "private" information somehow,  but all depends on how the privacy is defined according to the Law. Anyway the question is very complex.

 
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 10:18:29 AM
Secret law
Technically, there is no such thing, but in Common Law jurisdictions like the USA, judicial precedents have something akin to the force of law, so they must be taken into consideration.  I think there are some things Congress can do to help matters:

1.  Strip FISC of its status as a court of record (meaning that its decisions could not be cited as precedent).  This would mean that FISC decisions would be guided entirely by publicly available statute law and appellate court rulings, not by its own precedents.

2.  Abolish the appellate court established by FISA (which has AFAIK, has only considered a handful of cases since it was established in 1979) and transfer appellate jurisdiction over FISC to the Federal Circuit, which would publish digests of its opinions dealing with cases appealed from FISC in the manner suggested in the article (opinions would be completely declassified when secrecy is no longer required; perhaps after 10 years by default, with the President having authority to extend the period up to five years at a time for a given case).  Cases could be further appealed to the Supreme Court in the usual manner.

A third item could probably only be done by order of the President, but I think it would help enormously:

3.  Make all legal opinions issued by the Justice Department for the general guidance of federal employees public record.  Advice on specific cases would continue to be confidential.  This would help to allay the suspicion that the Federal government is operating on the basis of secret rules, rather than publicly available statute and judicial precedents.

A fourth item could probably be done by act of Congress:

4.  Require any settlements of civil cases in which the US government or its civil officers (in their official capacities) are defendants to be made public record.  This would eliminate a category of "secret law" in the form of confidential consent decrees, which are sometimes alleged to govern federal policy in a number of areas, such as environmental protection.  Settlements of cases in which the federal government is the plaintiff and one or more private citizens are defendants could be partly or completely sealed by a court if it decides that such is necessary to protect privacy.

I suspect that others have other ideas.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 5:05:07 PM
Re: Secret law
I agree. These are all good points, NSA is not operating under a secret law, these would most likely not solve ultimate problem. Also, it is not only US, other countries' information agencies performing secret services of course.
willackerly
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willackerly,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2016 | 1:36:37 PM
Re: Secret law
jries921, that is a really thoughtful response, and those are fantastic ideas.  I think there are still real opportunities to make progress on these issues, and I'm pursuing one in particular, so it would be great to connect directly. If you're interested, give me a shout on email – accessible via my author profile
masoodm
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masoodm,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/24/2016 | 10:24:32 AM
Snowden: Hollywood Highlights 2 Persistent Privacy Threats
My question to Snowden is that after exposure, to what extent the IT sector had taken real-time challenges on privacy threats.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 4:58:29 PM
Misuse of data
 

I would not consider a potential, if you have data nobody else has you would use it for your benefits, that is main reason you made the effort to get it. Better not to allow anybody have any data exclusively.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/24/2016 | 5:09:29 PM
World with no secrecy
 

Another way of getting rid of this complex situation is not to have secret data, if everything is open to everybody then we will not have this madness and no need to play hide and seek game. Not realistic but it would be perfect if it happens. 
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
9/26/2016 | 7:34:32 AM
Re: World with no secrecy
While I am concerned with the way that the world is moving in terms of personal privacy, this is the silver lining I am secretly hoping for. A world with no privacy is one I don't want to come to pass, but if it does, it needs to be an open book for everyone. If there are some with privacy while everyone is without, that gives enormous power to a select few who can keep their skeletons hidden.

However I am not optimistic. Privelege like that has traditionally been one rule for many and another for a few and it seems likely to continue.


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