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Anatomy Of A Social Media Attack
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2016 | 9:19:08 PM
Re: Buffett example
@Whoopty: It's not even about always being seen as a good guy.  It is a fact of business that people are going to dislike you for whatever reasons they decide to come up with -- whether deservedly so or not.

The point is to not go out of your way ticking off the wrong people unless the benefit exceeds the risk and cost factors.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2016 | 7:32:18 AM
Re: Buffett example
Agreed, being seen in the public as a "good guy," is a must, though in Sony's case not having juvenile level security would have helped a lot too! 

I wonder sometimes if it's worth cultivating relationships with international security companies too, as we've seen U.S. firms defending U.S. firms and the same in Russia in recent years. Being on good terms of all sorts of security companies so you have a good reputation in different circles is likely to be a postive step too.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/24/2016 | 8:48:09 PM
Re: Buffett example
@Whoopty: Yep.  The number one way to protect yourself -- that most people don't think about -- is to make yourself not a target (or, at least, to make yourself as less attractive a target as possible).

The first big aspect of that is exactly what you said: Don't be the easy pickings -- the low-hanging fruit.  Do the basics, which a lot of companies don't.  All it takes is one minor slipup combined with shoddy policy.  (TJX, I'm lookin' at you.)

The second big aspect is to do what you can in terms of how you do business to not actively motivate people.  Sony is a great example of a "don't" in this way -- when they sued a 13-year-old hacker for modifying his own Playstation.  OBVIOUSLY they were going to get hit super hard and super often by the hacktivists of the world for that move.  (A good lawyer will tell you when you can sue and for what.  A great lawyer will tell you all that and also tell you the risk-benefit analysis of all of your options.)
Whoopty
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50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/24/2016 | 7:51:03 AM
Re: Buffett example
That's the thing though isn't it? No one is vigilant all of the time. All it takes is a slip up when you're tired, or not paying attention and you are compromised. Ultimately, it's about not being the lowest hanging fruit and doing your utmost to remain safeguarded as best you can.

If someone wants to hack apart you they are likely going to do it. You need to make yourself more of a time or money sink when it comes to cracking and that way they're likely to focus on someone else instead. 
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2016 | 1:57:32 PM
Buffett example
If an employee at Berkshire Hathaway would fall for that sample Warren Buffett spoof -- with the name spelled incorrectly twice, and only 40 followers -- then that employee may well be too darn stupid to work for B.H. in any capacity.

That said, I realize that there are (slightly) more convincing spoofs out there than this.  But still.

In any case, a little training can go a long way.


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