Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Anatomy Of A Social Media Attack
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2016 | 9:19:08 PM
Re: Buffett example
@Whoopty: It's not even about always being seen as a good guy.  It is a fact of business that people are going to dislike you for whatever reasons they decide to come up with -- whether deservedly so or not.

The point is to not go out of your way ticking off the wrong people unless the benefit exceeds the risk and cost factors.
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2016 | 7:32:18 AM
Re: Buffett example
Agreed, being seen in the public as a "good guy," is a must, though in Sony's case not having juvenile level security would have helped a lot too! 

I wonder sometimes if it's worth cultivating relationships with international security companies too, as we've seen U.S. firms defending U.S. firms and the same in Russia in recent years. Being on good terms of all sorts of security companies so you have a good reputation in different circles is likely to be a postive step too.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/24/2016 | 8:48:09 PM
Re: Buffett example
@Whoopty: Yep.  The number one way to protect yourself -- that most people don't think about -- is to make yourself not a target (or, at least, to make yourself as less attractive a target as possible).

The first big aspect of that is exactly what you said: Don't be the easy pickings -- the low-hanging fruit.  Do the basics, which a lot of companies don't.  All it takes is one minor slipup combined with shoddy policy.  (TJX, I'm lookin' at you.)

The second big aspect is to do what you can in terms of how you do business to not actively motivate people.  Sony is a great example of a "don't" in this way -- when they sued a 13-year-old hacker for modifying his own Playstation.  OBVIOUSLY they were going to get hit super hard and super often by the hacktivists of the world for that move.  (A good lawyer will tell you when you can sue and for what.  A great lawyer will tell you all that and also tell you the risk-benefit analysis of all of your options.)
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/24/2016 | 7:51:03 AM
Re: Buffett example
That's the thing though isn't it? No one is vigilant all of the time. All it takes is a slip up when you're tired, or not paying attention and you are compromised. Ultimately, it's about not being the lowest hanging fruit and doing your utmost to remain safeguarded as best you can.

If someone wants to hack apart you they are likely going to do it. You need to make yourself more of a time or money sink when it comes to cracking and that way they're likely to focus on someone else instead. 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/23/2016 | 1:57:32 PM
Buffett example
If an employee at Berkshire Hathaway would fall for that sample Warren Buffett spoof -- with the name spelled incorrectly twice, and only 40 followers -- then that employee may well be too darn stupid to work for B.H. in any capacity.

That said, I realize that there are (slightly) more convincing spoofs out there than this.  But still.

In any case, a little training can go a long way.


Cloud Security Startup Lightspin Emerges From Stealth
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  11/24/2020
Look Beyond the 'Big 5' in Cyberattacks
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/25/2020
Why Vulnerable Code Is Shipped Knowingly
Chris Eng, Chief Research Officer, Veracode,  11/30/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: We are really excited about our new two tone authentication system!
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-4126
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-01
HCL iNotes is susceptible to a sensitive cookie exposure vulnerability. This can allow an unauthenticated remote attacker to capture the cookie by intercepting its transmission within an http session. Fixes are available in HCL Domino and iNotes versions 10.0.1 FP6 and 11.0.1 FP2 and later.
CVE-2020-4129
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-01
HCL Domino is susceptible to a lockout policy bypass vulnerability in the LDAP service. An unauthenticated attacker could use this vulnerability to mount a brute force attack against the LDAP service. Fixes are available in HCL Domino versions 9.0.1 FP10 IF6, 10.0.1 FP6 and 11.0.1 FP1 and later.
CVE-2020-9115
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-01
ManageOne versions 6.5.1.1.B010, 6.5.1.1.B020, 6.5.1.1.B030, 6.5.1.1.B040, ,6.5.1.1.B050, 8.0.0 and 8.0.1 have a command injection vulnerability. An attacker with high privileges may exploit this vulnerability through some operations on the plug-in component. Due to insufficient input validation of ...
CVE-2020-9116
PUBLISHED: 2020-12-01
Huawei FusionCompute versions 6.5.1 and 8.0.0 have a command injection vulnerability. An authenticated, remote attacker can craft specific request to exploit this vulnerability. Due to insufficient verification, this could be exploited to cause the attackers to obtain higher privilege.
CVE-2020-14193
PUBLISHED: 2020-11-30
Affected versions of Automation for Jira - Server allowed remote attackers to read and render files as mustache templates in files inside the WEB-INF/classes & <jira-installation>/jira/bin directories via a template injection vulnerability in Jira smart values using mustache partials. The ...