Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Wendy's Could Become Test Case For New EMV Liability Rules
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
jc01480
50%
50%
jc01480,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/3/2016 | 11:12:57 PM
I was one of them...
I am a security professional working at one of the greatest organizations there are. It came as a surprise to me one day when I received an email saying my card had been compromised and a new one was being issued. Within two days I had another (yes, the first one had a chip) EMV card. I haven't verified with my bank as to exactly where this card was compromised, but I speculate it was at Wendy's as my wife and I always ate there on the run like we do. Again, not certain it was them and I'll find out in due course. But so far there is no word from the bank about being charged for the replacement and no indications any money was fraudulently deducted from my account. I give kudos to my financial institution for making me aware and taking measures to cancel the old one while a new one was in my mailbox. So far, my life has not been affected whatsoever by this incident and I hope that the retail industry will adopt the technology required to safeguard retail transactions in lieu of risk mitigation by absorbing the losses. Eventually that risk mitigation will be a red flag to come and get it. And it does speak to the idea of a company's ethics when they are willing to implement this type of behavior because the loss of your PII still wouldn't cost them as much as implementing the technology to prevent it would. Should it be their decision? Just to save them some money? Hopefully this isn't the case for all persons affected. Thanks for reading and happy hunting!
RetiredUser
100%
0%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 7:21:47 PM
Re: EMV. Bah.
Past EMV hacks include man-in-the-middle attacks via programming a second chip (FUN card) to accept any PIN entry.  You solder that chip to the card's original chip. This increases the thickness of the chip from 0.4mm to 0.7mm.  This made insertion into a PoS possible (Ars Technia, 2015; researchers Houda Ferradi, Rémi Géraud, David Naccache, and Assia Tria).  Hackers took advantage of PIN authentication at the time being decoupled from transaction verification on EMV cards in Europe.  I'm not up-to-date on how much of this is still possible, but I know it annoys me (the chip) and many are still opposing the idea EMV is inherently safer.
dewald
100%
0%
dewald,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/30/2016 | 1:58:16 PM
Re: EMV. Bah.
"Particularly annoying is the liability shift having come so soon in this process.".  Visa announced the shift in Summer 2011.  Four years is too "soon"?
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 12:06:26 PM
EMV. Bah.
Particularly because studies have indicated that EMV is not inherently safer than magnetic-stripe cards (it simply has different vulnerabilities that are exploited in different ways), and that it has been harder for some defrauded customers to be made whole because credit card companies and merchants automatically assume that EMV is impervious, I am pretty annoyed about EMV being foisted upon us by Visa et al. in the US.

Particularly annoying is the liability shift having come so soon in this process.  The credit-card companies are the ones who foisted this upon us, and they're the ones with the deeper pockets.  I think there was poor policy planning here.


Why Cyber-Risk Is a C-Suite Issue
Marc Wilczek, Digital Strategist & CIO Advisor,  11/12/2019
DevSecOps: The Answer to the Cloud Security Skills Gap
Lamont Orange, Chief Information Security Officer at Netskope,  11/15/2019
Attackers' Costs Increasing as Businesses Focus on Security
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/15/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
Navigating the Deluge of Security Data
In this Tech Digest, Dark Reading shares the experiences of some top security practitioners as they navigate volumes of security data. We examine some examples of how enterprises can cull this data to find the clues they need.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-5118
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-18
A Security Bypass Vulnerability exists in TBOOT before 1.8.2 in the boot loader module when measuring commandline parameters.
CVE-2019-12422
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-18
Apache Shiro before 1.4.2, when using the default "remember me" configuration, cookies could be susceptible to a padding attack.
CVE-2012-4441
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-18
Cross-site Scripting (XSS) in Jenkins main before 1.482 and LTS before 1.466.2 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML in the CI game plugin.
CVE-2019-10764
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-18
In elliptic-php versions priot to 1.0.6, Timing attacks might be possible which can result in practical recovery of the long-term private key generated by the library under certain conditions. Leakage of a bit-length of the scalar during scalar multiplication is possible on an elliptic curve which m...
CVE-2019-19117
PUBLISHED: 2019-11-18
/usr/lib/lua/luci/controller/admin/autoupgrade.lua on PHICOMM K2(PSG1218) V22.5.9.163 devices allows remote authenticated users to execute any command via shell metacharacters in the cgi-bin/luci autoUpTime parameter.