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Wendy's Could Become Test Case For New EMV Liability Rules
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jc01480
50%
50%
jc01480,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/3/2016 | 11:12:57 PM
I was one of them...
I am a security professional working at one of the greatest organizations there are. It came as a surprise to me one day when I received an email saying my card had been compromised and a new one was being issued. Within two days I had another (yes, the first one had a chip) EMV card. I haven't verified with my bank as to exactly where this card was compromised, but I speculate it was at Wendy's as my wife and I always ate there on the run like we do. Again, not certain it was them and I'll find out in due course. But so far there is no word from the bank about being charged for the replacement and no indications any money was fraudulently deducted from my account. I give kudos to my financial institution for making me aware and taking measures to cancel the old one while a new one was in my mailbox. So far, my life has not been affected whatsoever by this incident and I hope that the retail industry will adopt the technology required to safeguard retail transactions in lieu of risk mitigation by absorbing the losses. Eventually that risk mitigation will be a red flag to come and get it. And it does speak to the idea of a company's ethics when they are willing to implement this type of behavior because the loss of your PII still wouldn't cost them as much as implementing the technology to prevent it would. Should it be their decision? Just to save them some money? Hopefully this isn't the case for all persons affected. Thanks for reading and happy hunting!
RetiredUser
100%
0%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 7:21:47 PM
Re: EMV. Bah.
Past EMV hacks include man-in-the-middle attacks via programming a second chip (FUN card) to accept any PIN entry.  You solder that chip to the card's original chip. This increases the thickness of the chip from 0.4mm to 0.7mm.  This made insertion into a PoS possible (Ars Technia, 2015; researchers Houda Ferradi, Rémi Géraud, David Naccache, and Assia Tria).  Hackers took advantage of PIN authentication at the time being decoupled from transaction verification on EMV cards in Europe.  I'm not up-to-date on how much of this is still possible, but I know it annoys me (the chip) and many are still opposing the idea EMV is inherently safer.
dewald
100%
0%
dewald,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/30/2016 | 1:58:16 PM
Re: EMV. Bah.
"Particularly annoying is the liability shift having come so soon in this process.".  Visa announced the shift in Summer 2011.  Four years is too "soon"?
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2016 | 12:06:26 PM
EMV. Bah.
Particularly because studies have indicated that EMV is not inherently safer than magnetic-stripe cards (it simply has different vulnerabilities that are exploited in different ways), and that it has been harder for some defrauded customers to be made whole because credit card companies and merchants automatically assume that EMV is impervious, I am pretty annoyed about EMV being foisted upon us by Visa et al. in the US.

Particularly annoying is the liability shift having come so soon in this process.  The credit-card companies are the ones who foisted this upon us, and they're the ones with the deeper pockets.  I think there was poor policy planning here.


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