Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Medical Device Security Gets Intensive Care
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/23/2016 | 12:45:07 PM
Showtime, anyone?
I think Homeland deserves a little credit for this -- highlighting how pacemakers can be hacked to kill patients!

(And, of course, years before, then-VP Dick Cheney's pacemaker was adjusted to take it offline and make it unhackable -- to prevent exactly that kind of situation.)
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
1/25/2016 | 8:08:45 AM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
It's definitely something that's been on the radar for some time, for sure. But the good news--as with much of the IoT and connected consumer device space--the good guys have been ahead of the bad guys so far. Even so, the good guys need to keep the momentum and take action.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/25/2016 | 6:57:41 PM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
> But the good news--as with much of the IoT and connected consumer device space--the good guys have been ahead of the bad guys so far.

Is this truly correct and apt, though?

It seems to me that the bad guys have determined that, from a long-term view, there simply isn't as much profit to be had in hacking pacemakers to kill people and whatnot as there is in simply hacking healthcare companies to steal PHI.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
1/25/2016 | 9:11:19 PM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
Well, it would likely be a very different type of attacker altogether that went after pacemakers. 

 
RetiredUser
50%
50%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/26/2016 | 2:46:53 AM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
As we've seen with the auto industry, hack after hack has painted a new picture of the automobile, switching the view from vehicle of leisure and labor to a careening comet of death.  Being locked in a car hurtling across a highway invokes claustrophobic feelings; imagine those emotions felt when you are the vehicle and the hack is occurring inside you.  

Yes, it's time for sure to get the right white hats working on every known hackable medical device and for patches and new designs to emerge from the rubble.  Perhaps we'll also see some major revision ideas around ISO/IEEE 11073 - Health informatics - Medical / health device communication standards.    
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/26/2016 | 11:20:35 AM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
To be fair, the automobile has long been depicted as a "careening comet of death."  One need merely watch driving ed videos from the '50s and '60s to know that.  ;)
RetiredUser
50%
50%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2016 | 11:26:25 AM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
You said it, Joe!  It's sad, of course.  Especially as a father, I have serious reservations about the automobile industry and how far each model is tested before making it to the car lot; add computers to the complexity of safety research and testing, and the sweat begins to pour...
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2016 | 12:32:46 PM
Re: Showtime, anyone?
@Christian: You can at least feel better about the fact that cars are far safer than they were decades ago.  There are some interesting (if, at times, hard to watch) videos out there of crash tests -- replete with crash-test dummies -- involving head-on collisions between a new car and a car from, say, the '60s.  The difference between the damage the cars (and car drivers/passengers) take is astounding.
SecurityFool
50%
50%
SecurityFool,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/8/2016 | 12:00:39 PM
Ransomware
And what of Ransomware?

 

Today ransomeware is one of the most profitable endeavors in the hacking arena. When hackers figure out that they can hack into a medical device and essentially hold someone hostage on their life, how quick do you think they will pay?

Or hacks into a system and causes medical practitioners to be unable to provide critical care? Who gets hit with the malpractice suit if the doctor cannot get accurate imaging results or cannot use a crash cart because it is compromised?

 

I see a lot of scary stuff if this industry doesn't take this serios. Banks didn't take protecting their devices serious enough for a while there, and they are paying ransoms repeatedly. When you have a small population of technically proficient hackers in countries where it isn't illegal to demand a ransome, how can we even go get the bad guys? It is a tough situation, and until governments declare hacking a form of terrorism or at minimum criminal activity, healthcare organizations need to be protecting themselves from the bad guys.

At a minimum, have a security plan in place so that the easily deterred hackers are motivated to turn their efforts to easier targets.

 


Firms Improve Threat Detection but Face Increasingly Disruptive Attacks
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  2/20/2020
Ransomware Damage Hit $11.5B in 2019
Dark Reading Staff 2/20/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
The concept of application security is well known, but application security testing and remediation processes remain unbalanced. Most organizations are confident in their approach to AppSec, although others seem to have no approach at all. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-17274
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
NetApp FAS 8300/8700 and AFF A400 Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) firmware versions 13.x prior to 13.1P1 were shipped with a default account enabled that could allow unauthorized arbitrary command execution via local access.
CVE-2019-17275
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
OnCommand Cloud Manager versions prior to 3.8.0 are susceptible to arbitrary code execution by remote attackers.
CVE-2020-3169
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
A vulnerability in the CLI of Cisco FXOS Software could allow an authenticated, local attacker to execute arbitrary commands on the underlying Linux operating system with a privilege level of root on an affected device. The vulnerability is due to insufficient validation of arguments passed to a spe...
CVE-2020-3170
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
A vulnerability in the NX-API feature of Cisco NX-OS Software could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to cause an NX-API system process to unexpectedly restart. The vulnerability is due to incorrect validation of the HTTP header of a request that is sent to the NX-API. An attacker could expl...
CVE-2020-3171
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-26
A vulnerability in the local management (local-mgmt) CLI of Cisco FXOS Software and Cisco UCS Manager Software could allow an authenticated, local attacker to execute arbitrary commands on the underlying operating system (OS) of an affected device. The vulnerability is due to insufficient input vali...