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Youve Been Attacked. Now What?
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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/24/2015 | 2:59:47 PM
Thanks
An important article for executives to read.  Alas, many CEOs and CIOs take the attitude, when faced on Friday afternoon with news of an attack or other intrusion or compromise, of "We'll deal with it first thing Monday."
ryanvela
ryanvela,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/25/2015 | 12:45:04 AM
Re: Thanks
Excellent observation.  I can attest to receiving Monday morning calls from CISOs after they've known of an incident since the previous week.  Not only that, I see well meaning security groups struggle with containing a situation they found earlier in the week only to find themselves tired, frustrated, and annoyed Friday afternoon.  Friday afternoons and Monday mornings are when I get most of my calls for assistance.
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 7:48:34 AM
Re: Thanks
This is why security needs to have an equal seat at the table. A CISO should be able to bring pivotal points to light and delineate why its imperative to get things moving as soon as possible. Ideally...


Unfortunately, many times this is not the case.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2015 | 11:06:45 PM
Re: Thanks
@Ryan: There is a lot of debate regarding to whom the CISO should report.  The CIO is often the typical and obvious choice, but the CIO and the CISO often have conflicting goals -- budgetary, political, and more.  Many think the CISO should report to the CFO or even the CEO.  Others think the CISO should report directly to the board.
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2015 | 8:41:22 AM
Re: Thanks
@Joe. Very true. I think it comes down to how your corporate environment is structured. Do most of the C level employees report to the board? If yes, then the CISO should as well.

Or is a C level position given to so many people that everyone is a C level for something. In a case like this it becomes unmanageable. I know the latter case sounds not applicable, but I just wanted to poke at the Chief level being put in front of many job titles with high specificity when it probably shouldn't.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/28/2015 | 4:31:47 PM
Re: Thanks
@Ryan: Good point.  We are now at the level where we have everything but a Chief Making Sure There Are Enough Paper Towels in the Men's Room Officer.  "C-level" is losing its meaning and import.
ryanvela
ryanvela,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/27/2015 | 6:59:58 PM
Re: Thanks
@Ryan and @Joe, you both have good points.  I have worked cases with organizations that have and do not have formal CISO positions.  One organization had the CISO reporting to the CIO, another had the CISO reporting to the CFO, and I am aware of an organization where the CIO reports to the CISO, but I have not worked on a breach for that type of organization.  Nevertheless, all of the organizations have a person that carries the function of the CISO, regardless of the person's title, whether they report to the board, or what staff they have under them.  But two changes (new or enhanced) I have found that organizations that have gone through breaches initiate:  1. Cybersecurity maintains top-down advocacy; and by top, obviously the C-suite; and  2. Cybersecurity has a voice at regular board meetings; not just once a year at the "cyber review" meeting.
Enrico Fontan
Enrico Fontan,
User Rank: Strategist
10/27/2015 | 7:39:30 PM
Re: Thanks
@ryanvela/@Ryan/@Joe I agree with the C-level security concept. During critical events a CISO need to be able to interact at C-level to be fast and operate in a transparent way.

If the CISO reports to the CIO I hardly think that such a step could be possible:

"Involved the local FBI office at the start of the investigation"
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/28/2015 | 4:33:28 PM
Re: Thanks
And, of course, ideally, for major enterprises and even some SMEs, there was some pre-investigation involvement with law enforcement contacts -- for instance, meet-and-greets and tabletop exercises in preparation for better security postures and more effective involvement should the day come when it is necessary.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/28/2015 | 4:35:51 PM
Re: Thanks
Indeed, companies have found their liability favorably reduced/eliminated in situations where they simply addressed cybersecurity enough at board meetings.  There are more benefits to security than mere security.


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