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State Trooper Vehicles Hacked
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RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 2:03:58 PM
Nice to See
It's nice to see that cyber security is becoming more prevalent at the law enforcement level in terms of the police and special task forces because they are the closest link to the general populous when something nefarious is occuring. Before, there were specialists that needed to be consulted, and there still are but I think that general population didn't know the proper protocols and so it made it difficult to gather data and spread awareness.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
9/30/2015 | 2:17:40 PM
Re: Nice to See
This was a pretty interesting project, with some key players. It's also really amazing that both Ford and GM would comment when I contacted them. This is the first I've seen them say much if anything about car hacking and cybersecurity for vehicles. 
StaceyE
StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/30/2015 | 7:39:10 PM
Re: Nice to See
Wow. The thought if cars being hacked makes me glad I still drive a car from the 20th century.
StaceyE
StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/30/2015 | 8:07:06 PM
Re: Nice to See
Wow. The thought if cars being hacked makes me glad I still drive a car from the 20th century.
carmicheals
carmicheals,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2015 | 1:15:06 AM
OBD, not ODB!
"Sagar Momin, engineer and co-founder of Kaprica, says his proof-of-concept tool could be plugged into the car's so-called On Board Diagnostic s (ODB) II in the form of a dongle."

On-Board (Vehicle) Diagnostics is OBD II.  ODB (RIP) generally refers to the late Ol' Dirty Bastard of Wu-Tang Clan fame...

I see this mislabeling quite frequently in articles that discuss On-Board (Vehicle) Diagnostics.

The devil is indeed in the details!  
OBD Engineer
OBD Engineer,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2015 | 10:53:19 AM
THESE ARTICLES ARE SO DECEVING
I am an OBDII expert. These articles about hacking into cars are so deceiving.  In order to hack most cars, physical access to the cars diagnostics port in the interior of the car is required.  Want to stop a hack, unplug the device in the cars port.  One would have to break into a cop car first in order to HACK it.   People saying they need a solution right away are just trying to generate business for themselves.  NO SOLUTION is needed and as a matter of fact, solutions will kill legitimate business that plug dongles into cars for monitoring.  Its simple, dont buy an OBDII piece from someone without testing it first or without a reputation.  ANYBODY can hack your pc if they sell you a harddrive or flash memory stick that has physcial access.   There is no reason for this and they are asking to add cost to a vehicle for nothing.  Again it requires physical access to the car.  Nothing should be done to limit the access on the OBDII port.  This would also drastically intefere with vehicle emissions inspections as well. Cars with wireless connections or wireless OBDII dongles that allow commands to be sent to car are a different sotry.  We purposely do not allow commands to be sent to a car through our wireless OBD dongle for that reason.  We control the commands .

 
mwalker871
mwalker871,
User Rank: Guru
10/1/2015 | 12:23:34 PM
Re: THESE ARTICLES ARE SO DECEVING
Do you really think it is so very difficult to gain surrepticious physical access? Where are these cars serviced? Are there any mechanics there who could be bribed/threatened. That's usually how "security" is thwarted, from the inside.

As soon as the word "can't" comes out of your mouth, or off your fingers, know you too will be pwned.

We're easily 2 years into solid awareness on this issue: arstechnica -- disabling-a-cars-brakes-and-speed-by-hacking-its-computers-a-new-how-to

It's pretty clear that not just the OBD II port is at risk.

This cracking example is just one more case of security as an afterthought, and a consequence of "we can do it, so we will do it" in design/engineering.

I'm kinda surprised we haven't seen a OnStar crack.
mwalker871
mwalker871,
User Rank: Guru
10/1/2015 | 12:36:27 PM
Re: THESE ARTICLES ARE SO DECEVING
Maybe that's more like 5 years: autosec.org -- faq.html

And maybe OnStar has been targeted.

Anyone that thinks they are going to beat the distributed efforts of a fraction of the intellectual resources of the internet has an idiot for an advisor.

Also don't forget the internet runs on internet time, not your wallclock time or your calendar time.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
10/1/2015 | 12:38:18 PM
Re: OBD, not ODB!
Thanks for the typo catch--we fixed it this AM. =)
OBD Engineer
OBD Engineer,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2015 | 12:50:50 PM
Re: THESE ARTICLES ARE SO DECEVING
Yes it is very difficult to gain physical access.    Again just check the port and if there is no device there there is no access.  Its that simple.  Look at the study.  They had to go through the port.  Nothing you can do will prevent someone from going under the hood and installing wires or changing components.   No matter how ridicualously expensive you make it, if I can modify parts, I can get in or simply replace them.  The article used physical access to the OBDII port.   If you make using the OBDII port harder, the end result is that diagnsotics information will be only owned by the CAR MANUFACTURERS.  Thats what they want.  I am guessing thats who financed the study.  If the study was done proper, it would be done to prevent access through telematics and WIFI systems like ONSTAR and not worry about physcial access. Worrying about hacking through physical access is a waste of consumer money.  Imagine if I had to protect a computer from physical access that was not connected to anything IE no internet.  The cost to design slots and electronics that could not be physically modified would be extreme.  THE OBDII PORT IS NOT A PROBLEM.  NO DEVICE PLUGGED IN - NO PROBLEM.  As soon as you give wireless access outside the vehicle then it becomes a problem unless the device plugged into the OBDII port allows CAN (or other communication protocols)  commands to be sent direclty to the car.     
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