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Healthcare Organizations Twice As Likely To Experience Data Theft
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/11/2015 | 8:16:13 PM
Re: A cost effective approach
"Attackers are always looking for a cost effective approach."

Indeed, security research indicates that attackers -- like "defenders" -- are lazy, and constantly recycle code.  One security research company in Israel focuses on using predictive analytics to predict -- and defend against -- new attacks based upon old attacks and old malware and old software.
lynnbr2
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lynnbr2,
User Rank: Strategist
10/1/2015 | 1:22:21 PM
Re: A cost effective approach
I agree the article "perfectly focused the point," and it was in the very first sentence where Sara said that "healthcare not very willing to invest in defending it."

Look, if I'm the CIO or CISO and I go the CEO and say "the state of our security is an unknown-unknown" (to channel Don Rumsfeld), I'll likely be replaced in the next quarter after the CEO's executive search committee comes back with some candidates. Ok, suppose the CEO is a good guy, and allows the CISO to continue. (I'll defer the discussion of just how many CEOs are good guys to Matthew 19:24?) So next the CISO has to tell the CEO just how large a honeypot of $ he needs to secure things, and over what time period. Then the CEO has to get buy-in from the rest of the C-suite and the board. But time flies, and that money is spent and gone now, and regardless of whether the CISO squashed 15 vulns, 150 vulns, or 500 vulns, the state of security is still an unknown-unknown? Well, for sure the executive search committee is getting back in session. The CEO isn't ready yet to add this new, never ending, ever expanding cost into the companies' 10-K statements, when legal is telling him they're covered. One persons cost effective approach is another persons business tax.

 
Enrico Fontan
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Enrico Fontan,
User Rank: Strategist
10/1/2015 | 12:03:02 PM
A cost effective approach
I think the article perfectly focused the point:

"The end result is that attackers are far more willing to invest in stealing medical records than healthcare institutions are willing to invest in protecting them from being stolen."

Attackers are always looking for a cost effective approach. Healthcare institutions have to focus on system security and staff training (secure the human) if they plan to minimize such attacks.
lynnbr2
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lynnbr2,
User Rank: Strategist
10/1/2015 | 9:57:09 AM
Re: Healthcare is unique
Well, if you want to believe that healthcare is unique, go right ahead if that makes you feel better. But next time you go to the doctor's office or hospital, don't look too closely at that stack of six or nine papers they make you sign before you get to go past that locked door in the waiting room and actually see the doc.

Spoiler alert! Big Data is all about your healthcare records, already. Best that you don't look into MIB, Optum, Milliman, and their ilk, and their associated "members". This means there is already online, daily, trending to near real time, inter-company trading of your healthcare "data."

I like how MIB has a rebuttal statement pre-prepared at their website - cause they're just waiting for you to check them out - "...relying on unverifiable statements that may or may not have been made in the 1970's, 80's and 90's...we ask that you "take them with a grain of salt."" While Millimam's US home page even shows up with a website https certificate error.

Welcome to the 21st century of healthcare.

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 9:15:39 PM
Re: Healthcare is unique
Worth pointing out that encryption at rest, while useful, is hardly a complete solution -- as security pundits pointed out in the wake of the Anthem brouhaha.  After all, if access and keys are compromised, so too is the encryption, and -- with it -- the data.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2015 | 9:13:28 PM
Re: Healthcare is unique
> One solution to this problem it to identify players in the black market,

Indeed, that seems to be the perennial goal...

> if I am guessing I will goes that we may find big insurance companies behind it.

...although I don't carry quite the same conspiracy theory.  :)
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:42:40 PM
Re: Healthcare is unique
One more thing, one way to make it uses for the hackers is to encrypt it at rest, they may get the data but not be able to decrypt and utilize it.  Unless you are NSA of course :--))).
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:39:27 PM
Re: Healthcare is unique
One solution to this problem it to identify players in the black market, if I am guessing I will goes that we may find big insurance companies behind it.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:36:47 PM
Re: Healthcare is unique
Agree. It is actually sad that there is a black market on health data. If it was just a public record there would have been much less prpblem.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 12:33:39 PM
Healthcare privacy
 

Healthcare data is target simply because it is kept private, if it was a public record it would not be  a target.

 

 
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