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Intel Takes On Car Hacking, Founds Auto Security Review Board
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jscott490
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jscott490,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/17/2015 | 12:16:11 PM
Looks like marketing to me
Intel doesn't have much of a presence in automotive electronics (they don't even show up in top 10 of automotive electronics providers), so this seems like more of a move to get into a market that they have continually failed in than anything else, to me. Even the infotainment systems are more likely to use smart phone processors and electronics where Intel also doesn't play well.

As seen from the hacker stuff, the weak point in all automotive electronics is the infotainment systems. They have not been protected as well as they should be, and they have been used along with in-depth research to reprogram the micros that are on the CAN bus and send erroneous messages. Harden the entry point (i.e. infotainment) and the rest will be fine.
Enrico Fontan
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Enrico Fontan,
User Rank: Strategist
9/15/2015 | 12:28:22 PM
New security controls
As started in the SCADA systems, we need to adopt security controls also in the Automotive environment.

Car system integration can be a big step, think about engines interacting with GPS to understand terrain data (objective:save fuel).  

We still can have "isolated" systems, but as in other IT systems we need to think about data flow and data access permissions.

On the other hand, without such controls system integration can bring several risks.
DarkerMind
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50%
DarkerMind,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/15/2015 | 11:27:09 AM
Re: Vehicle hacking
@DontBeknown You make excellent points. I think it was naive to design this system without planning for security
DontBeknown
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0%
DontBeknown,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/14/2015 | 11:19:45 PM
Vehicle hacking
It is interesting how we think that we "need" our engine, brakes, transmission, etc. to be connected via network to our entertainment system and internet.

They've been running into this in the aircraft world as well.  In the past, you were not allowed to have ANY primary system in an aircraft hooked into any other system.  In otherwords - Engine # 1 circuts would be separated physically and electronically from any of the other systems (primary navigation did this as well).  All primary systems would be done this way for safety reasons - you wouldn't want a problem on Engine #2 to take out the controls for Engine #1 now - would you?  

With the advent of networking - they (engineers) figure they can do it better - forgetting all that has been learned about safety in the past.  Why would you ever hook the entertainment system (and internet) to engine controls?  Or brakes? or the transmission?  It need not be that way. It's gone as far as hackers being able to OPEN THE DOORS on moving vehicles on the freeway!!  Really?  Is this level of integration required or is it just an open barn door of "we can so we will"? 

Take this level of sophistication out of cars.  It is not needed.  The entertainment system (and navigation system) should be separate from the drivetrain and safety equipment in ANY vehicle.  This level of networked BS is stupid, and dangerous.


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