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MIT, Cambridge, Other Universities Get D's In Internet Security
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RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2015 | 9:52:47 AM
Advanced Technology Promotes Increased Vulnerabilities
I think that to a certain extent, advanced technology that is not made with security in mind will offer quite a few more vulnerabilities and exploit points than standardized technologies used on a more prevalent basis. This is apparent with MIT's poor performance. Reason being is these technologies focus more on the functionalities. Their ability to do more, makes them an easier target because unfortunately the security is an afterthought.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2015 | 9:55:30 AM
Knowledge is OpenSource
The fact that education is 300% more likely to be infected is surprising but not too unbelievable. If you think about education in the form of knowledge sharing than for it to be the most effective it would need to be open for people to add to it. Its greatest benefit is its greatest security flaw. Its much like Android. Open-Source is great for innovation but also a travesty for security.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
9/11/2015 | 9:58:37 AM
Re: Knowledge is OpenSource
All you have to do is spent a few minutes on a college campus, where WiFi is everywhere, students (many with no concern about security) with all types of BYOD devices are online constantly, and you can see how easy a target universities can be. 
CarolineB773
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50%
CarolineB773,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/15/2015 | 5:57:13 AM
Re: Knowledge is OpenSource
I couldn't agree more. It's practically a breeding ground for security risks. You also make a very important point about the students themselves not being intererested in security which is not going to help matters. Also with high social media and Email usage, a college would be a great way to spread malware etc.
Enrico Fontan
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50%
Enrico Fontan,
User Rank: Strategist
9/14/2015 | 10:03:58 AM
Security Awareness
Campus LAN have to be considered as "Red" or "High Risk" networks. To minimize such risks staff employees have to receive a detailed training in Security topics as password management, network segregation and log analysis.
charger971
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50%
charger971,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/16/2015 | 4:47:56 PM
Very true, but nothing new
Sadly college campuses have been open and exploitable from the beginning.

In the 90s with trojans such as backorifice and netbus being prevalent, one could simply run a port scan across a campus network and find hundreds of infected systems and take control of them.

Despite technology improvements and security being a major buzzword, it appears the trend of insecured educational systems continues today.

A side note; this threat goes beyond college, and and affects the whole education system.  Consider webcams or security cameras at middle and high schools, student PII, and more, all with less security and focus than typical corpate data.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/23/2015 | 9:45:33 PM
UVA
The UVA example is particularly important.  It goes to the adage that the best security is to not be a target in the first place -- but now with nation states and hacktivists becoming more involved in hacking major organizations, it is next to impossible to predict whether or not someone you work for, someone who works for you, one of your customers, or someone else that you're associated with will inevitably wind up a target...and putting you in the crosshairs as a matter of association.


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