Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
New Phishing Campaign Leverages Google Drive
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
jamieinmontreal
50%
50%
jamieinmontreal,
User Rank: Strategist
8/3/2015 | 11:34:25 AM
Single Sign On Vs Password Synchronization
The old Maxim says "Necessity is the mother of invention", I would add that "convenience is the father".   This is another area where we see the "need" being over-ridden by the "convenience"; the need for password security on everything (legitimate) has been trumped by the convenience of not having to type a few extra characters when logging in.   SSO is a vault of passwords masked by an authentication method and some scripts / APIs to apps, nothing wrong with it until someone figures out how to get in to your vault and take the passwords.

So what's the difference between the vault and the synchronized password?  Surely only one password is more of a risk than several (even if they are all placed in a handy vault for the bad guy to get a hold of)?

First of all the level of complexity for that one password can be higher because now your user has only one password to remember.

Secondly remediation when the password is revealed or hacked is SO much easier with a synchronized password - you simply change one password to clean all systems connected to your Password Manager.   

Compare that with the SSO world where users have multiple passwords they then have to change inside the SSO setup in order to restore the security of their password access.

Finally - no matter what method you choose, stale access rights are the next thing on your agenda as you try and strengthen your defences - users won't tell you what they DON'T need, nor will application owners tell you who should no longer have access.   

Neccessity is the mother of invention, convenience is the father.
LanceCottrell
50%
50%
LanceCottrell,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2015 | 5:42:14 PM
User training will never be enough
Great post, thanks! This attack shows once again that even sophisticated users will fall for phishing attacks. As security experts we need to give up on the idea that we can train our way out of this. While training is useful we need to create our tools under the assumption that user's will do nothing to contribute to their own protection.


COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 10/27/2020
Are You One COVID-19 Test Away From a Cybersecurity Disaster?
Alan Brill, Senior Managing Director, Cyber Risk Practice, Kroll,  10/21/2020
Botnet Infects Hundreds of Thousands of Websites
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  10/22/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-8260
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-28
A vulnerability in the Pulse Connect Secure < 9.1R9 admin web interface could allow an authenticated attacker to perform an arbitrary code execution using uncontrolled gzip extraction.
CVE-2020-8261
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-28
A vulnerability in the Pulse Connect Secure / Pulse Policy Secure < 9.1R9 is vulnerable to arbitrary cookie injection.
CVE-2020-8262
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-28
A vulnerability in the Pulse Connect Secure / Pulse Policy Secure below 9.1R9 could allow attackers to conduct Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) and Open Redirection for authenticated user web interface.
CVE-2020-8263
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-28
A vulnerability in the authenticated user web interface of Pulse Connect Secure < 9.1R9 could allow attackers to conduct Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) through the CGI file.
CVE-2020-8239
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-28
A vulnerability in the Pulse Secure Desktop Client < 9.1R9 is vulnerable to the client registry privilege escalation attack. This fix also requires Server Side Upgrade due to Standalone Host Checker Client (Windows) and Windows PDC.