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How I Would Secure The Internet With $4 Billion
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AnthonyE396
AnthonyE396,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/20/2015 | 12:53:35 AM
Re: Is $4 Billion enough?
Maybe before you spend 4 $Billion you should secure your own site OWASP and not send clear text passwords back to subscribers who then have to change all their account details

JUST SAYING
BobP756
BobP756,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2015 | 9:53:40 AM
Question: Open-sourced development frameworks
"Imagine a trove of open-source development frameworks that can be leveraged to ensure security from the inception of any new product."

If this type of framework is an internet security solution:

1.  Why hasn't it been done already?

2. Is there anything in existence that approaches this solution?
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
6/1/2015 | 4:29:47 PM
Re: Is $4 Billion enough?
LOL! Very funny.
BertrandW414
BertrandW414,
User Rank: Strategist
6/1/2015 | 2:20:21 PM
Re: Is $4 Billion enough?
Sorry Marilyn, the answer to that question is classified. ;-)
Sonatype
Sonatype,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/1/2015 | 1:59:53 AM
In an Ideal World ...
"I would hire a large, senior team of security-minded developers and assessment professionals to focus on providing security services for the most popular open source software."

This would be great, wouldn't it? Unfortunately this isn't the case for most developers. We definitely agree that security has not been properly prioritized during the development of applications and other technologies. In the interim, what we can do is have development teams utilize repository managers that ensure only high quality open source components are used in applications - by identifying and remediate faulty components throughout the application's life cycle.
jmanico
jmanico,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/30/2015 | 12:05:00 AM
Re: Is $4 Billion enough?
Hello and thank you for commenting. The comment from RyanSepe is spot on. While the 4 billion dollar figure is an arbitrary number, it points to the scale and effort needed for this effort to succeed. Thank you again for reading this article and taking the time to comment.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2015 | 1:37:55 PM
Re: Is $4 Billion enough?
True, Ryan. It could be just an arbitrary number, but I'm wondering of the $4B is related to an estimate of what someone in Congress estimates to be the cost of the  information-sharing program. I should have been a little clearer in my comment. But then again , it is Friday!
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2015 | 1:31:07 PM
Re: Is $4 Billion enough?
I think the exact number is arbitrary. Most likely just wanted a high enough number to get the point across that security in itself is its own business. I see many validate points within this article however they have their downsides as well. Focusing on open source areas provides more visiblity. Which is a proponent and detriment in itself. More people to help, more people to destroy. The work force to analyze the overall frameworks would need to be massive.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2015 | 12:59:40 PM
Is $4 Billion enough?
Interesting point of view, Jim. But I'm curious about where you came up with the $4 billion dollar figure.


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