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Hacking Airplanes: No One Benefits When Lives Are Risked To Prove A Point
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Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2015 | 3:25:02 PM
Re: Wired article hints it was simulation system, not real aircraft
Even though it is simulation and he did succeed to hack the simulation that is something we should take seriously. Simulation is most like a prototype and gives away vulnerabilities. I also say, this is not a way to earn credit, he can easily be discredited and I do not think he would take that risk if there is no vulnerability. 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2015 | 3:20:29 PM
Re: Remembering 911
Obviously we see mire cyber-attacks and there is a industry built behind that, lots of people are benefiting from each cyber-attack even though they are not involved in the attacks.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2015 | 3:06:30 PM
Re: Remembering 911
I could not consider 9/11 as cyber-attack, the reason it was not detected because it has not enough footprint on the cyber world.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2015 | 3:04:43 PM
TV system vs. Flight control system
I hope and assume there are some type of isolation so through a TV system you can not control plane's flight path. Remember, number one rule of security having layered approach, systems should be isolated.
mulfinge
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mulfinge,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2015 | 11:38:59 AM
Wired article hints it was simulation system, not real aircraft
From reading the Wired magazine article ("Feds Say That Banned Researcher Commandeered a Plane"), I infer that he performed the engine control on a simulation system that he created using software he was able to obtain. Further corroborating this is that he says the Feds took one paragraph of his out of context, but he would not elaborate further.

Nice point about security researchers willing to go to great extents to make a name for themselves. Clearly Chris Roberts is in this camp, but my guess is that he did not commandeer a real aircraft.
ODA155
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ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
5/20/2015 | 10:22:37 AM
Re: Remembering 911
Wow...
HCHENG085
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HCHENG085,
User Rank: Guru
5/19/2015 | 8:59:04 PM
Remembering 911
That would benefit to cyberwarfare or terrorist attacks such as the 911 incidence. In addition, it also provided an evidence to a possbility of the missing MH370 - which may still be in the desert of Australia.

 

The simpliest benefit is on demanding ransom. 

 

All in all, power corrupt - hacking abilities escalates the desires of cybercriminal who will generate infinite possibilities.


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