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Vixie Proposes 'Cooling-Off Period' For New Domains To Deter Cybercrime
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
5/6/2015 | 5:08:36 PM
domain value
I wonder how much the average spam domain makes before being shut down. That figure is just shy of the optimal price for domains.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
5/6/2015 | 5:14:23 PM
Re: domain value
Vixie noted that the $10 is nada for these guys--they make so much money that they don't mind dropping the $10 here and there.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/6/2015 | 7:13:52 PM
Domain Names Are a Global Commodity
I'm not clear on how this is going to work in the global sense.  While not a bad idea, what dent can we put in the abuse of a global commodity like domain names?  If anything, this could skew how domain names are registered and managed in the future, causing both organizations that do registration and the customers seeking to remain under the radar or avoid risk of rejection to change their habits.  This means a new strategy for domain brokers, for small businesses who utilize large numbers of domain names in their business model, and of course the criminals who need a large volume of sites for their own activities.  What does this mean for security professionals?  Potentially a harder time adjusting to a mass change in the way forensics are done (or data analysis, more accurately) in terms of identifying, tracking and categorizing malicious actors by their domain procurement patterns.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/7/2015 | 8:43:40 AM
First Check
I agree that instantaneous activation is not needed for legitamite purposes but what procedure do they plan to take to determine whether the requester is malicious or not? I would imagine that most malicious intenders tried to hide all signs of their true purpose. How are these people or organizations rooted out?
Frank_Schilling
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Frank_Schilling,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/7/2015 | 9:40:46 AM
Re: domain value
What stops the bad guys from waiting 11 minutes? New names are getting cheaper. They are being offered as low as $0.50 cents a year. Bad guys could wait 364 days into the registration cycle and pay the renewal (a whopping single dollar for 2 years), are we going to have a 364 day waiting period? Maybe this guy's next epiphany will be setting minimum prices?  "Anything to battle the criminals", who are clearly a lot bolder in their thinking than Paul Vixie. 
Mark Jeftovic
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Mark Jeftovic,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/7/2015 | 10:32:14 AM
How to score an inactive domain?
Hi Paul, I can see a 10 minute pause being reasonable, but if the domain isn't resolving, how would you know it's nefarious? Are you saying it would be up to triangulating it's registration data with previous bad actor domains?

 
PaulV378
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PaulV378,
User Rank: Strategist
5/7/2015 | 9:35:30 PM
Re: How to score an inactive domain?
mark:

Are you saying it would be up to triangulating it's registration data with previous bad actor domains?

yes. evil people have a very different metadata pattern than normal people. frankly, my proposal could be simpler. just a public record, in stream form, of all domain creation and modification events for all ICANN licensed TLD's, would give the internet security industry a better standing point than we have today.

PaulV378
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PaulV378,
User Rank: Strategist
5/7/2015 | 9:39:54 PM
Re: domain value
frank:

What stops the bad guys from waiting 11 minutes?

nothing. but in that 11 minutes we can pre-blackhole them, as well as send complaints to their registrars, who in light of those complaints may decide that the community has crowdsourced their due diligence on a new client, and that it would be in their best interests to refund the domain fee and release the reservation. (or not -- that part is not something anyone can require, even though it may be good business practice in a higher-sunlight environment.)

let me turn that question around: what stops the good guys from waiting 11 minutes? that is, what is it about a short public comment period of around 15 minutes that would so stifle innovation that it would be a crimp on human productivity, creativity, and other freedoms?

PaulV378
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PaulV378,
User Rank: Strategist
5/7/2015 | 9:44:13 PM
Re: First Check
ryan:

what procedure do they plan to take to determine whether the requester is malicious or not? 

i have a few ideas in this regard, but the specifics are open to endless innovation by the security industry. the point is not to mandate that review be done, but rather to make review possible before the domain goes live.

imagine starting every footrace (you're a good guy, racing various bad guys) where you don't hear the starting gun until the bad guy is already halfway down the field. good luck stopping him before he makes his money.

there is a vibrant internet security industry, who are well able to feed a stream of "domain creation" and "domain modification" events into their own proprietary machinery for detecting and predicting badless based on patterns. if they get it wrong they will lose customers. if they get it right they will gain customers. that's the kind of innovation i'd like to support!



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