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As Malware Surges, U.S. Remains Biggest Source of Attacks
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stallion m
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50%
stallion m,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/4/2015 | 12:55:08 AM
Re: 100% true
Yes the modern world uses the hacking and spamming are the main weapon, the largest countries like usa, china, india all add moe concentration in security issues, i think usa develop more security sheals on their systems 
coreyross
50%
50%
coreyross,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/29/2015 | 5:56:22 AM
100% true
The information provided here is 100% true
Some Guy
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50%
Some Guy,
User Rank: Moderator
4/27/2015 | 1:11:41 PM
Useless Statistic of the Day
This is a function of the hosting/spam market, and is completely orthogonal to who is perpertraing the attacks.

 

About as useful as saying the majority of bank robbery getaway vehicles are from GM -- nothing to do with cause and effect, and everything to do with the distribution of cars by manufacturer. Or how about that 99.9% of people die in bed. Should we go after beds to eliminate deaths?

"10 points for style, minus several million for good thinking." -- Zaphod Beeblebrox
Shabby Chic
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100%
Shabby Chic,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2015 | 9:29:46 AM
Yep
Not a surprise... Us is also a country with a lot of security business
Whoopty
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0%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
4/27/2015 | 7:08:33 AM
Patriotism
I think a lot of the reason the rest of the world gets painted as the worst when it comes to hacking, is because a lot of security companies originate from the US. There almost seems to be a patriotic slant appearing in the security community, with the likes of Kaspersky pointing out US threats and US companies pointing out Russian and Chinese attacks. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/26/2015 | 11:59:14 PM
Domestic vs. foreign
I suppose this isn't that much of a surprise...and, in a way, it's actually a bit of encouraging news because it suggests that the cyberwar epidemic isn't quite so terrible.

I wonder what the stats are in other countries in terms of how many cyberattacks are domestic vs. foreign...
Sum~Guy
50%
50%
Sum~Guy,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2015 | 9:04:09 AM
Re: No Surprise - Or is it?
How ironic that in order to reply to a story that denigrates the use of social-media login portals such as fecebook, twitter, google, etc, that I am given the option to use those same services to log into the darkreading server.

As I am one of the few non-juvenille people using the web that does not (and has never) used fecebook and the like (my HOSTS file is full of them and their related ilk) I used a throw-away email service to register to comment on this story.

My comment being that when I get a link in spam email purporting to be from my ISP, or my bank, or some other entity that plausibly could have and therefore request that I update my various personal information (name / dob / credit card info, etc), I fill every comment field with the most vile and pejorative statements you can imagine about russians and putin (along with phrases such as "free Ukraine" and "get your military out of the Ukraine").  If the fake form that I'm filling out requires a valid credit card number to be entered before it is accepted, that's easily done by consulting one of many on-line number-generating sites.

What this article doesn't mention is that even if the majority of IP's that are port-scanning you or sending your American or Canadian organization direct-to-mx spam are located in US/Canada, they are invariably controlled by russian hackers.

Something that I do in my company is to be ultra acressive when it comes to blocking IP's trying to deliver mail to our SMTP server.  I'm blocking upwards of 75% of the entire IPv4 address space, including about 80 "A" classes.    I have the ability to consult our entire email logs going back to 1998, tease out all the IP's that have ever delivered "good" mail to us and make sure I'm not blocking those going forward.  It's an incredibly effective way to block spam.
RetiredUser
100%
0%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
4/26/2015 | 8:01:45 AM
No Surprise - Or is it?
Such blanket numbers without drill-down clarification of what each IP's designation as malicious really means aren't necessarily helpful outside of scaring consumers and businesses into purchasing information security products.

Additionally, held within those numbers are likely members who do actually originate from outside the US.  

This isn't to say the information isn't useful, but it's just not as useful as it could be, meaning that detailed breakdowns are needed, separation of the "malicious ecosystem' is required for the data to truly have a wider range of impact on its readers, all distinctions illustrated clearly between hobbyist criminals and serious cyber espionage actors, etc.

Personally, I've never been a fan of OpenID and similar, and this report in some ways reinforces my belief that those who use apps like WordPress, Facebook, etc. for accessing multiple sites for the sake of convenience are asking to be compromised. 

I read the threat brief in full on the Webroot website and I'd like to see the deep data, that which is more meaningful to the InfoSec community rather than the high-level glitz that would resonate only with end-users and procurement staff for corporations looking for a reason to spend money on cybersecurity initiatives.


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