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Smartphone Security Shootout
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andregironda
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andregironda,
User Rank: Strategist
4/24/2015 | 3:37:17 PM
iOS just as vulnerable as Android
In the right context (or not) iOS is just as vulnerable as Android. Both are more vulnerable than BlackBerry ever was, but that's not relevant today.

What we must do is provide stringent review of all factors -- jailed or jailbroken devices, rooted or not, factory image or not, fully upgraded or not, etc.

Have seen major issues (severely critical risks) on jailed iOS 8.3 devices. Have seen minor (informational risk only events) on Android with a certain app ecosystem and a certain policy level of SELinux and/or SEAndroid. It depends on many factors.
JavierF126
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JavierF126,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2015 | 9:02:17 PM
Android
I completely DISAGREE with the author. By far iOS is the worst and most unsecure phone device, with plenty of bugs and also possible to inject whatever application to monitor all chats, location, etc WITHOUT jailbreak. Moreover Snowden, told public that it has a NSA Backdoor. Then, windowsphone sends all what you type to microsoft. Better is ANDROID nowadays.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
4/26/2015 | 7:07:46 PM
No Commercial Solutions Are Secure
I believe that no commercial solutions are secure; that is, unless they allow you to close the holes yourself.  I've used many phones, and after having to please family by having a phone I truly don't want and being forced to - shall we say -  "adjust" the phone to my liking, I immediately felt better about using it.  No connection to a store-front (all software direct downloaded, MD5 hash validated, GnuPG-checked, etc.) and, when needed, encrypted connections wirelessly.  Sad - how little freedom the consumer has over hardware and software that everyone takes for granted, ubiquitous mainstays of everyday life and easy avenues to everything we own, and everyone we know, if we let them be.

And that's just for personal use.  So, no, I don't recommend an iPhone, Android or any other smartphone at the workplace if you happen to work around sensitive data.  For all the same reasons USB drives are unacceptable in some work environments, so should smartphones be - especially since most are miniature computers and pose far more a threat (whether used knowingly for the purpose or without the owner's knowledge) to sensitive data integrity than USB drives ever could.  By way of example, I found usernames and passwords online once that I only ever entered on one of my first smartphones years ago.  That's right - never written down or used on a PC; and there, in a text file of usernames and passwords on a public website, found via a Google search, my private information.

Leave the smartphones at home, folks.  
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/26/2015 | 11:50:01 PM
Re: Android
iOS certainly tops Android when it comes to security bugs and vulnerabilities found, but, still, a reported 96 percent of all mobile malware targets Android -- particularly because of how easy it is to do so (although do-badders are starting to find ways around Apple's iron-gated App Store with phishing techniques).

What it really comes down to, I think, is fostering a good security culture -- which is much more important than platform decision.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/26/2015 | 11:52:06 PM
Re: No Commercial Solutions Are Secure
It reminds me of the depressing thought that BlackBerry (for better or worse) used to be THE choice for security for mobile devices...until they gave in to foreign power demands to disable their security or provide government backdoors.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
4/27/2015 | 1:09:43 AM
Re: No Commercial Solutions Are Secure
Wait, are you suggesting, Joe, that BlackBerry's slogan "There's good security and then there's National Security" and their marketing statement that BlackBerry is the "perfect balance of protection and productivity" hasn't reeled your confidence back in?!  Imagine, the company is now focused on mobile security software; amazing what a Department of Defense nod can do for your roadmap...
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/27/2015 | 9:01:52 AM
Samsung Knox
I was curious during its inception how the Samsung KNOX security suite would perform. Is it still enabled by default on Samsung based phones or was that removed due to user gripes? If its not set as default I guarantee that the majority of users will not turn it on even if prompted.
Blog Voyage
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Blog Voyage,
User Rank: Strategist
4/28/2015 | 12:08:36 PM
Both are vulnerable !
In fact, iOS is just as vulnerable as Android. Both are more vulnerable than BlackBerry ever was, but that's not relevant today.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/29/2015 | 11:24:04 PM
Re: No Commercial Solutions Are Secure
@Ian: After the Snowden revelations, would YOU trust a tech company on data privacy and data security if one of their biggest customers is the federal government?  ;)

(For that matter, should we continue to trust IBM?)  ;)
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/29/2015 | 11:26:23 PM
Re: Both are vulnerable !
Funny how older tech is often more secure.

Maybe we should go back to typewriters and smoke signals.
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