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Context: Finding The Story Inside Your Security Operations Program
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josh@idrra.com
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
3/24/2015 | 11:00:24 AM
Re: Powerful Analysis
Yes, correct Marilyn.  Just like contributing to DarkReading. ;-)
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/24/2015 | 10:30:16 AM
Re: Powerful Analysis
Thanks, Josh. Like most things, I expect this is something that takes a little bit of practice, to get good at!
josh@idrra.com
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[email protected]drra.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/24/2015 | 10:24:13 AM
Re: Powerful Analysis
Thank you Marilyn for what is a great question.  In general, pitfalls that can impede or obstruct the narrative can vary widely, but a few common ones are:

* Lack of telemetry to support narrative-building

* Lack of intelligence/background contextual information regarding activity of interest

* Shortage of expertise require to design narrative-driven workflow

* Immature or unreliable methods for enrichment of data and addition of contextual information

The narrative would seem to be preferred over alerts for internal incidents (i.e., incidents within the organization).  Perhaps for external incidents (e.g., attacks on partners or third parties) where there is less control, less telemetry, and/or less influence, narratives wouldn't work so well.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/24/2015 | 10:09:04 AM
Re: Powerful Analysis
Josh, what are some of the common pitfalls to watch out for when applying a narrative approach to security operations programs? And when does it not make sense to use this strategy?
josh@idrra.com
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
3/23/2015 | 9:08:00 PM
Re: Powerful Analysis
Thank you for your comments and question.  I think that after detection, one needs to move to analysis/forensics, and then on to response.  What's cool about the narrative approach is that it gets us much further down the road of analysis/forensics than alerts do.  When the puzzle is partially or wholly assembled for us, some of the analysis/forensics that needs to be done is also done for us.  Helps to save time and reduce human error.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
3/23/2015 | 2:32:50 PM
Powerful Analysis
Great article! This type of thinking can be very beneficial in all aspects of life when trying to analyze a situation. It's not only the discovery phase however that may be difficult for a security program but the execution phase of what is done with that knowledge.

Do you recommend employing the same principles? Or how would you recommend proceeding after the detection phase?


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