Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
What You Need To Know About Nation-State Hacked Hard Drives
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
3/5/2015 | 6:55:57 AM
Re: Infected conference materials
A few years ago at DEF CON, there was a scare that the conference proceeding disk given to the press was infected with malware. I can't remember the year, or how it all got resolved (I think it may have been a hoax/rumor), but I can tell you that several reporters opted to view preso slides on DEF CON's webiste after that. =)
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/4/2015 | 11:39:58 PM
Re: Infected conference materials
You know air gaps aren't failsafe when the International Space Station gets infected by an astronaut's USB stick.  ;)  (As Kaspersky reported in late 2013.)
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/4/2015 | 11:35:45 PM
Re: Infected conference materials
I remember, during a meeting with a manager at a client's bank, being stuck for a hard copy of a document that we needed.  I asked if we could print it off of my personal USB stick.  The banker was like, "Sure, absolutely."

Of course, it was an innocent request by an innocent actor, there was no malware involved, and everything went uneventfully.  But it occurred to me: What if I had been a hacker?  Or even an innocent person who unknowingly possessed an infected USB stick?

What bank security!
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 1:01:43 PM
Knock on effects
Although the security concerns people have may not be that valid, the worrying part for me is what his sort of news does to the confidence people have in US businesses. Despite already big impacts on services and sales within the tech industry, the security agencies continue to push for these pretty invasive tactics when it comes to worldwide snooping. 

I don't know if the trade off is going to be worth it. Not only do these schemes cost a lot to implement, but they're costing the American (and arguably the entire Western) tech economy too. 
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 12:31:45 PM
Re: Infected conference materials
Agree . Not only Hard Disk or USB devices, printer hacked in their firmware may give away path to the cover network, same things on CD, and other devices we have in the network such as switches, if you hacked hard disk you most likely hacked Cisco switches too.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 12:27:01 PM
Re: Infected conference materials
I agree, let's not accept anything from anybody. :--)). Remember nothing is free. I do not think vendors have any incentive for having, unless somebody else forces them to do so.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 12:24:57 PM
Re: Infected conference materials
I hear you. It is not only USB device problem. Any device connected any other decide is a risk to each other one way or another. They both need to be secure. If you have device at the firmware level no need to talk about security form that point forward.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 12:20:46 PM
Malware in the firmware
If malware is in the firmware then it is most likely embedded into those ROM devices where it is read only unless you touch the firmware and reprogram it. Malware in firmware is a good way of hacking a system :--))
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
3/3/2015 | 11:35:59 AM
Re: Infected conference materials
@aws0513, you hit on a key problem of the inherent challenge of taking technology away from users once the horse has left the barn. And even if you do airgap a system, there are still risks to it, such as an infected CD-ROM or USB.
aws0513
50%
50%
aws0513,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 10:37:24 AM
Re: Infected conference materials
It is the classic "what is old is new again" scenario.

Moreover, the ubiquity of USB storage devices has made it very difficult to proactively mitigate USB storage device risks.

Even though it is a policy at my current employer to prohibit the use of personal USB devices, we get instances almost daily where someone attempts or asks to use one on company owned devices (classic scenario is a vendor/customer that insists that they provide their files on a USB device). 

We security conscious pros see the problem, but even trained end users still do not comprehend or have concerns regarding USB storage risks.  This is even after our training materials discuss the problem at length.

I compare it to smoking.  For years, doctors have been telling people that smoking is bad, yet there is a large section of people that continue to smoke.  Albeit USB devices do not have addictive chemicals, their utility is highly addictive.
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
7 Old IT Things Every New InfoSec Pro Should Know
Joan Goodchild, Staff Editor,  4/20/2021
News
Cloud-Native Businesses Struggle With Security
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  5/6/2021
Commentary
Defending Against Web Scraping Attacks
Rob Simon, Principal Security Consultant at TrustedSec,  5/7/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-32606
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
In the Linux kernel 5.11 through 5.12.2, isotp_setsockopt in net/can/isotp.c allows privilege escalation to root by leveraging a use-after-free. (This does not affect earlier versions that lack CAN ISOTP SF_BROADCAST support.)
CVE-2021-3504
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
A flaw was found in the hivex library in versions before 1.3.20. It is caused due to a lack of bounds check within the hivex_open function. An attacker could input a specially crafted Windows Registry (hive) file which would cause hivex to read memory beyond its normal bounds or cause the program to...
CVE-2021-20309
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
A flaw was found in ImageMagick in versions before 7.0.11 and before 6.9.12, where a division by zero in WaveImage() of MagickCore/visual-effects.c may trigger undefined behavior via a crafted image file submitted to an application using ImageMagick. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to ...
CVE-2021-20310
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
A flaw was found in ImageMagick in versions before 7.0.11, where a division by zero ConvertXYZToJzazbz() of MagickCore/colorspace.c may trigger undefined behavior via a crafted image file that is submitted by an attacker and processed by an application using ImageMagick. The highest threat from this...
CVE-2021-20311
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-11
A flaw was found in ImageMagick in versions before 7.0.11, where a division by zero in sRGBTransformImage() in the MagickCore/colorspace.c may trigger undefined behavior via a crafted image file that is submitted by an attacker processed by an application using ImageMagick. The highest threat from t...