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Medical Identity Theft Costs Victims $13,450 Apiece
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Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/1/2015 | 3:00:38 AM
Re: An example > borrow insurance?
That's funny, Marilyn; it seems I *always* have to present my medical ID whenever I go in for a doctor's appointment.  I guess it depends where you go.
Sara Peters
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50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/27/2015 | 11:51:36 AM
Re: An example > borrow insurance?
@Marilyn  Wow! What did you do about it? And what sort of creature was Bridget?
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/26/2015 | 2:19:11 PM
Re: An example > borrow insurance?
Now that you mention it, @sarapeters, i've never had to present my ID for a medical appointment. And speaking of health records, i got an email from a Veterinarian's office in Seattle recently about an outpatient discharge report for a "Bridget" Cohodas (no relation-- as far as  I know). So much for confidentiality of PII . But then, maybe pets aren't covered by HIPAA. :-)
Sara Peters
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50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2015 | 12:49:10 PM
Re: An example > borrow insurance?
@Marilyn  Not really, Marilyn. Generally, they'll ask for your insurance card, but not your ID. And most of the time you're getting billed, not paying up front (except maybe a co-pay that you can pay in cash), so they won't even see a credit card or a checkbook with the wrong person's name on it.

They'll ask for all kinds of medical history on your first appointment. But since most healthcare centers don't share that information, they won't necessarily know that the 37-year-old Sara Peters with epilepsy at hospital A is one person and the 22-year-old 'Sara Peters' with diabetes is a different person, much less a fraud. This is one of those reasons that health information exchange technology could be useful.
JPtaylorL
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50%
JPtaylorL,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/26/2015 | 12:48:07 PM
huh?
So if anyone went out at looked at the HHS Wall of Shame (which is where public breaches of PHI are disclosed), you'll see that there are 278 breaches in 2014.   31 were actually as a result (self reported) of hacking.  The vast majority of other issues tagged - were mistakes or problems resulting from poor execution of policies and procedures.  Hacking is a problem.  Advanced malware is a problem.  However, GETTING GOOD AT RISK ASSESSMENTS, RESPONDING TO RISK, and EXECUTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES is STILL the most reliable method for avoiding getting owned. The spin is spin.
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/26/2015 | 11:09:50 AM
Re: An example > borrow insurance?
@Sara, Call me naive but how is it possible to borrow insurance? Don't you need to provide information about your identity, beyond simply the insurance card/number? 
Sara Peters
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50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2015 | 10:52:21 AM
Re: An example
@Nemos   Yes, you've got it. Health insurance in the US is very expensive, but the costs of medical appointments and procedures is INCREDIBLY expensive.

(For example, when I was admitted to the hospital a few years ago, the hospital room cost $800 per night. That's not including the doctors, the medication, the tests, the procedures, etc. The MRI I had was about $13,000 insurance, if I remember correctly. Even with insurance, the trip cost me a couple thousand dollars. Even with insurance, an ambulance trip cost me $600.)

And that's why people often ALLOW their friends/family to borrow their insurance. And why it costs so much to remediate the damage.

 
Nemos
50%
50%
Nemos,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/24/2015 | 5:50:29 PM
An example
Could you please give an example as here in Europe we have a bit different health system and I dont understand why one should cheat about his/her identity ? Is this action has to do that there is not a public insurance therefore you have to pay for your medical expenses ?


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