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Sony Hack: Poster Child For A New Era Of Cyber Attacks
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TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
2/17/2015 | 1:36:16 PM
Re: You don't get to choose if you are a target, your adversary does that for you
You guys in the industry would get a lot more credibility if you actually answered a question and quit this generic "anything can be hacked so you need me" message to get hired, consulting dollars or to sell products of questionable value.

By definition, any system designed to be used can be used. The question is by who. If you don't connect it to the internet, phone lines or even local LAN, then it is only going to be used by someone with physical access to the system. Period.

Guys like myself and Technoctrati want to know how someone gets hacked using two factor, when you must append a number which changes every 30 seconds to the end on a password you know. And you are in Russia and I am in US? How does spearphishing accomplish that? That's what I want to see in Dark Reading, not this generic no info stuff like this article and your comment.

If the problem is companies are so stupid they put their primary data server on the internet with Admin password of "123456", then say so. But if our company wasting our money on VPN tunnels and SecurId tokens because it does us no good, then explain why that is true.

My IBM i5 server is sitting at 10.29.231.57. Let's see you hack it from where you are at and install any malware on it. Talking about pawning Windows laptops hooked to a common WiFi is a freaking joke compared to the real world. Or least what I hop ethe real world is based on steps we try to take at our lowly Mfg company.
BurgessCT
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BurgessCT,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/17/2015 | 10:07:50 AM
You don't get to choose if you are a target, your adversary does that for you
Dimitri, excellent post, you hit on the most important of messages for all entities, be they small, medium or large, for profit or non-profit, you don't get to decide if you are fall within the targeting sights of an adversary who is making that detemination based on a decision tree of which you have no visibility.  

I was at the session where you and George destroyed some perfectly good laptops on stage, and subsequently shared your "prediction" with others via the RSA Conference blog. 

Please keep sharing your insights, it gives those are engaged in security awareness, architecture and resourcing cannon fodder for those discussions with those who say it can't happen to them.

All the best,

Christopher

CEO Prevendra, Inc.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
2/16/2015 | 5:52:39 PM
The How and Who dunit: Sony Pictures Entertainment ( Unplugged )
Thanks Dmitri for providing some possible scenarios for how Sony's network was compromised. Looking at this from a purely technical view. How was it carried out ? It was likely thorough spearphish and wiper malware ? Which might be considered another form of social engineering ?

If it was due to an end-user mistake which end-user ?   I am really intrigued that millions spent on IT infrastructure can be consistently breeched with seemingly ease.

And I still believe it had to be someone formally of SPE which there are many, but at least these people can now add Pascal to the list.
TerryB
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50%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
2/16/2015 | 1:58:33 PM
No two factor?
Regarding #1, the spearphish. I assume the hack was done from outside the internal network. Does this mean they had no VPN tunnel controlling that access, using something like SecurId tokens or SMS one time passwords to cell phones? If they did, how would you even phish something like that?

We are just a boring mfg company and we have that stuff. How could someone like Sony not? Seems like without #1, nothing can create 2, 3 and 4.

I've wondered this about many of the hacks I read about. The sites the public hits are in DMZ (or should be), how are they bridging from those to the private internal network behind them, which likely isn't even internet routable?


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