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3 Disturbing New Trends in Vulnerability Disclosure
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2015 | 2:50:08 AM
Re: Cybersecurity legislation
@Marilyn: Indeed; on a related note, I'm wary of Chairman Wheeler's net neutrality proposal until I get a chance to read it personally...but I can't read it personally yet because they won't allow the public to read it until February 26 -- the day of the vote.  All we know so far is that it's well over 300 pages long as at least one Commissioner has a lot of strong criticisms of it.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2015 | 2:43:19 AM
Re: All about the $
@Sara: That is very a good point.  The extortion scheme of variously screwing and unscrewing with a company's system then contacting them and saying, "Hey, I just so happen to be a security researcher who found this bug in your program and I'd be happy for you to contract my company for us to fix it at the modest cost of $50,000," is pretty common.

And, of course, if it is extortion, game theory dictates that you never pay the blackmailer because there's nothing to stop them from continuing to blackmail you.

OTOH, an organization may find itself in an emergency situation where it needs a brief respite before it can get a total handle on things.  If they have a cyberinsurance policy that covers extortion, so much the better.
Saylor Frase
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Saylor Frase,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/6/2015 | 2:54:35 PM
Re: All about the $
@sarapeters We are in agreement, Sara. Leveling with hackers and cybercriminals only intensifies the issue: the more successful black hat hackers are, the more they continue on their path, persuading others to join the ride.  

In regard to the President's proposed legislation, I agree the proposal would likely do little to prevent an attack, and may also stifle critical research. The one good thing newly proposed regulations are doing though, is bringing us one step closer to a national standard that makes all companies more responsible for the customer data they host.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/5/2015 | 11:51:42 AM
Cybersecurity legislation
I'm all for legislation that makes it harder for hackers but the devil is in the details. Not to  mention the question of whether our political leaders are capable of regulating technologies that so few of them understand.
Sara Peters
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50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
2/4/2015 | 10:52:14 AM
Re: All about the $
@JoeStanganelli  I don't know, Joe, paying someone who's actively trying to sell your data sounds dangerous, no matter how little they spent on it. It's kind of a weird way for attackers to effectively collect ransoms without even using ransomware. And as we know, loads of cybercriminals demanding ransoms are good for their word -- you pay, they release your stuff -- but plenty aren't.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/4/2015 | 2:09:08 AM
All about the $
Missing is the amount paid to the hacker.  It was probably insignificant enough to the company to be written off if it doesn't pan out, but it's definitely worth it if it results in a conversion, better security, and possibly additional intel on the black hat community that allows the company to be better prepared.
andregironda
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50%
andregironda,
User Rank: Strategist
2/3/2015 | 6:10:40 PM
Who was wrong
Microsoft, not Google


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