Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
New Adobe Flash 0-Day Used In Malvertising Campaign
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/4/2015 | 8:21:54 AM
Re: Security Measures
Thanks, that was very helpful. I am a huge Chrome afficionado and the Ad Blocker is definitely a major benefit. Not only from its security aspect but also its seamless integration into the browser. Another security benefit is it helps to mitigate noise. Through this means you will be more attune to handling an event when notified instead of dismissing it.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2015 | 4:43:23 PM
Re: Security Measures
Some people have argued that going with ad blocking software is like going without a firewall.
jps-forums
100%
0%
jps-forums,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/3/2015 | 4:30:06 PM
Re: Security Measures
There's actually 4 simple (and free) steps home users can take to drastically reduce their risk.  I had to put spaces in the URLS to get this to post, so take that into account when reading the links I include

 

1. Take advantage of OpenDNS (opendns .com/home-internet-security/). This requires you to set your primary DNS on your home router/wireless to use their DNS IP's. They filter many malicious sites for you and you get a free ability to implement content filtering for your family as well.  This is probably slightly complicated for your basic home user (you have to get them into their home router config under the IP and/or DHCP options to set the DNS) but their instructions make it much easier. 

2. Install anti-exploit software. Malware-bytes Anti-exploit Free edition protects all the major browsers and doesn't rely on def updates. Stops APT's in their tracks. Su[per tiny light-weight. You'll never know it's even running (https://www. malwarebytes. org/antiexploit/). The paid version protects more but stopping the exploits via browser for free is dang good.

3. Install some type of automated patching software that covers OS and 3rd party without any or much interaction at all. Secunia PSI is free and does an amazing job with little or no user interaction. (secunia. com/vulnerability_scanning/personal/) 

4. Use Chrome as much as possible and install the free ADBLOCK extension that stops all (99.9%) of adds (really useful on this particular exploit...plus it makes browsing much faster without all that garbage and annoying ads in vidoes/sidebars etc  (getadblock. com/)

Having a standard antivirus product is a given, although it probably protects you 20% if you are lucky. If you have AV, try to pick one that has host-based IPS built in as well (Intrusion Prevention System). The 4 above probably cover you 75%. Leaving a tiny window of risk left.  Every friend and family I help (there's many) has yet to been compromised or get infected using the tips above.  Best of all it will cost you 0 dollars to do the 4 things above.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2015 | 10:07:16 AM
Security Measures
Since, as the article denotes, it is very difficult to deny a malicious body the right to acquire digital ad space; are there any best practices in general for the user population to avoid this type of attack? For example, Ad-blockers, etc.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2015 | 3:17:58 AM
Guess I need to install Google Ultron
O, to go two weeks without having to update Adobe Flash!  #firstworldproblems


More SolarWinds Attack Details Emerge
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  1/12/2021
Vulnerability Management Has a Data Problem
Tal Morgenstern, Co-Founder & Chief Product Officer, Vulcan Cyber,  1/14/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
2020: The Year in Security
Download this Tech Digest for a look at the biggest security stories that - so far - have shaped a very strange and stressful year.
Flash Poll
Assessing Cybersecurity Risk in Today's Enterprises
Assessing Cybersecurity Risk in Today's Enterprises
COVID-19 has created a new IT paradigm in the enterprise -- and a new level of cybersecurity risk. This report offers a look at how enterprises are assessing and managing cyber-risk under the new normal.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-20619
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-19
Cross-site scripting vulnerability in GROWI (v4.2 Series) versions prior to v4.2.3 allows remote attackers to inject an arbitrary script via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-29450
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-19
Affected versions of Atlassian Confluence Server and Data Center allow remote attackers to impact the application's availability via a Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerability in the avatar upload feature. The affected versions are before version 7.2.0.
CVE-2020-36192
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-18
An issue was discovered in the Source Integration plugin before 2.4.1 for MantisBT. An attacker can gain access to the Summary field of private Issues (either marked as Private, or part of a private Project), if they are attached to an existing Changeset. The information is visible on the view.php p...
CVE-2020-36193
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-18
Tar.php in Archive_Tar through 1.4.11 allows write operations with Directory Traversal due to inadequate checking of symbolic links, a related issue to CVE-2020-28948.
CVE-2020-7343
PUBLISHED: 2021-01-18
Missing Authorization vulnerability in McAfee Agent (MA) for Windows prior to 5.7.1 allows local users to block McAfee product updates by manipulating a directory used by MA for temporary files. The product would continue to function with out-of-date detection files.