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New Patent Eliminates Passwords
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ScottJGoldman
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ScottJGoldman,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2015 | 7:24:14 PM
Re: What's so bad about passwords?
FULL DISCLOSURE: I am the co-founder and CEOMof TextPower, the company mentioned in this article that developed the patented technology. To be clear, our system does use a cell phone to send text messages but there are also other aspects to the patent. The pertinent fact, though, is that the cell phone transmits a critical and unique piece of information about itself when it SENDS, but not when it receives, a text message. Passwords are yes, easily implemented, changeable, recoverable, etc. The problem is that they are also easily compromised, forgotten and guessed. Imagine that you had a personal keypad that could log you into any website. You'd never have to choose, remember, record, reset or type an ID or password ever again. You'd just type a few numbers on the keypad and hit "enter" and the magic behind the keypad would identify you and authenticate you all in one step, That's what SnapID does - your cell phone is that personal keypad and the patented technology is the magic.
HAnatomi
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HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2015 | 9:36:28 PM
We cannot live without the likes of passwords.
Some people shout that the password is dead or should be killed dead.  The password could be killed, however, only when there is an alternative to the password.  Something belonging to the password(PIN, passphrase, etc)and something dependent on the password (ID federations, 2/multi-factor, etc) cannot be the alternative to the password.  Neither can be something that has to be used together with the password (biometrics, auto-login, etc).

At the root of the password headache is the cognitive phenomena called "interference of memory", by which we cannot firmly remember more than 5 text passwords on average.  What worries us is not the password, but the textual password.  The textual memory is only a small part of what we remember.  We could think of making use of the larger part of our memory that is less subject to interference of memory.  More attention could be paid to the efforts of expanding the password system to include images, particularly KNOWN images, as well as conventional texts.
MrKlingon01
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MrKlingon01,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2015 | 1:40:22 PM
What's so bad about passwords?
Yes, I know - I deal with compromised accounts and passwords every day - but I don't see how someone gets a patent for a system that requires a user has a cellphone. Passwords are easily implemented, easily changed, revoked and can be shared when you need to delegate authorization - this isn't a bad thing. 


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