Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
New Patent Eliminates Passwords
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
ScottJGoldman
ScottJGoldman,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2015 | 7:24:14 PM
Re: What's so bad about passwords?
FULL DISCLOSURE: I am the co-founder and CEOMof TextPower, the company mentioned in this article that developed the patented technology. To be clear, our system does use a cell phone to send text messages but there are also other aspects to the patent. The pertinent fact, though, is that the cell phone transmits a critical and unique piece of information about itself when it SENDS, but not when it receives, a text message. Passwords are yes, easily implemented, changeable, recoverable, etc. The problem is that they are also easily compromised, forgotten and guessed. Imagine that you had a personal keypad that could log you into any website. You'd never have to choose, remember, record, reset or type an ID or password ever again. You'd just type a few numbers on the keypad and hit "enter" and the magic behind the keypad would identify you and authenticate you all in one step, That's what SnapID does - your cell phone is that personal keypad and the patented technology is the magic.
HAnatomi
HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2015 | 9:36:28 PM
We cannot live without the likes of passwords.
Some people shout that the password is dead or should be killed dead.  The password could be killed, however, only when there is an alternative to the password.  Something belonging to the password(PIN, passphrase, etc)and something dependent on the password (ID federations, 2/multi-factor, etc) cannot be the alternative to the password.  Neither can be something that has to be used together with the password (biometrics, auto-login, etc).

At the root of the password headache is the cognitive phenomena called "interference of memory", by which we cannot firmly remember more than 5 text passwords on average.  What worries us is not the password, but the textual password.  The textual memory is only a small part of what we remember.  We could think of making use of the larger part of our memory that is less subject to interference of memory.  More attention could be paid to the efforts of expanding the password system to include images, particularly KNOWN images, as well as conventional texts.
MrKlingon01
MrKlingon01,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2015 | 1:40:22 PM
What's so bad about passwords?
Yes, I know - I deal with compromised accounts and passwords every day - but I don't see how someone gets a patent for a system that requires a user has a cellphone. Passwords are easily implemented, easily changed, revoked and can be shared when you need to delegate authorization - this isn't a bad thing. 


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Building the SOC of the Future
While an attacker just needs to find one vulnerability to get in to the network, the defender has to look everywhere. Defenders have to identify, disrupt, and stop attacks in the short period of time between when an attacker gets in and causes damage. One way is a security operations center to get that "all the time" coverage. What's Inside: --AI and cybersecurity response --Automation --Proctive threat hunting --Next-gen SIEM
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2022-3276
PUBLISHED: 2022-10-07
Command injection is possible in the puppetlabs-mysql module prior to version 13.0.0. A malicious actor is able to exploit this vulnerability only if they are able to provide unsanitized input to the module. This condition is rare in most deployments of Puppet and Puppet Enterprise.
CVE-2022-41574
PUBLISHED: 2022-10-07
An access-control vulnerability in Gradle Enterprise 2022.4 through 2022.3.1 allows remote attackers to prevent backups from occurring, and send emails with arbitrary text content to the configured installation-administrator contact address, via HTTP access to an accidentally exposed internal endpoi...
CVE-2022-31680
PUBLISHED: 2022-10-07
The vCenter Server contains an unsafe deserialisation vulnerability in the PSC (Platform services controller). A malicious actor with admin access on vCenter server may exploit this issue to execute arbitrary code on the underlying operating system that hosts the vCenter Server.
CVE-2022-31681
PUBLISHED: 2022-10-07
VMware ESXi contains a null-pointer deference vulnerability. A malicious actor with privileges within the VMX process only, may create a denial of service condition on the host.
CVE-2022-3275
PUBLISHED: 2022-10-07
Command injection is possible in the puppetlabs-apt module prior to version 9.0.0. A malicious actor is able to exploit this vulnerability only if they are able to provide unsanitized input to the module. This condition is rare in most deployments of Puppet and Puppet Enterprise.