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WiIl Millennials Be The Death Of Data Security?
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Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2015 | 10:48:37 AM
Security and privacy
 

Today, nobody really cares about security until they were hit, some would have concern around privacy. When it comes to millennials privacy would be less of a concern. That simply means we will see more hacking but less action to avoid them. We obviously need just opposite of it.
dholmesf5
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dholmesf5,
User Rank: Author
1/28/2015 | 10:47:04 AM
At least they'll have someone to blame
In the same way that all the Generation Xers blamed the Baby Boom for all the world's ills, the Millenials can blame the Generation Xers for not building more security into the systems.

Or perhaps we Genreation Xers can pass the blame back to the Boomers for not including security in the Internet in the first place!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
1/27/2015 | 5:33:19 PM
Re: Ok Millennials, defend yourselves!
Why should they worry if every time their debit card or credit card is compromised, it gets replaced? Or if their Facebook account is hijacked, they just get FB to fix it. I don't think this is just a millenial problem--I think it's a consumer in general problem. Not much to sweat unless you're hit with a personal targeted attack, financial ruin, etc. "I just get a new debit card" is a famous quote I've heard from millenials and elders. 
ODA155
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ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2015 | 5:00:59 PM
Re: Ok Millennials, defend yourselves!
Marilyn Cohodas... OK... I'm personally biased when it comes to this question, mostly because I'm not a Millennial and because I'm a security professional I tend to question anything regarding data security and privacy, especially mine.

So something happened last week, I heard about this app called "WAZE", so I went out to their website and checked out their "Privacy Policy" (...by the way, you have none), then I went to the Google Play to see what the permissions were to use this app... and OMG, let me put it this way, you're basically giving away your phone and whatever information that's on it, you may as well stand on a corner and pass out prepared documents with everything about yourself.This app will create an account for you based on your phone number and other information it gets from your device!

So I mention this after a department meeting where about 10 of the people ARE Millennials, and they all use it, but none of them took the time to read the Privacy agreement of look at all of the permissions needed. "It's a cool app" that's what they said, they all assume that their information is already known to whoever wants it. I know my little survey was not scientific by no means, but I wonder what would the numbers be if there were a real poll... makes me wonder.

But, to answer the original question "Will Millennials Be The Death Of Data Security?"... I hope they're smarter than that and understand the costs.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/27/2015 | 2:53:00 PM
Ok Millennials, defend yourselves!
Are you really that tone-deaf when it comes to data security? 
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