Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
New Data Illustrates Reality Of Widespread Cyberattacks
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
GonzSTL
50%
50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2015 | 12:16:11 PM
Re: Security Suite versus Cost
Keeping up with the bad guys is a never ending battle. The threat landscape is always widening, and the sophistication of attacks grows with each successful breach. What's a company to do? There is no such thing as a bottomless budget so something has to give. Within that budget is the expense of security products and employee training to keep up with technology. Perhaps we should rethink the strategy of keeping all security activities in-house. Years ago, I worked for a service company – outsourced Payroll and Human Resources applications and even functions. The philosophy behind the marketing was that companies should stick to their core competencies and outsource other functions to companies that have invested heavily to provide those services at a high level of competency. There is no reason why security services shouldn't be one of those outsourced functions, especially in this age of connectivity.

Imagine a company that has invested heavily in (at the time) state of the art security appliances. They pour lots of dollars into installation, configuration, training, optimization, etc. Well, what was state of the art then becomes somewhat outdated very rapidly given the ever changing threat landscape, increasing sophistication of the attack vectors, and mitigating technology advances. The company then has to spend a lot every year just to update and maintain those systems (hopefully not forklift and replace them), and train employees on the updates, in addition to whatever "normal" training they have to undergo. Outsourcing the hardware and monitoring components seems like a more reasonable and predictable cost. Within the company, there needs to be a very comprehensive and well defined Event and Incident Response strategy that can rapidly act upon any suspect event identified by the solution provider. Target had a similar model, but the breach was largely aided by an improperly handled event; their security personnel were notified of the suspect event (malware presence) by their service provider, but their incident handling procedures failed them.

I'm sure many companies have the strategy where they throw technology in to resolve a security gap, giving them an increased sense of security, but in reality, unless the companies have a sound security strategy in place that is based on well known basic security practices (such as the SANS 20 Critical Controls among others), all that technology will only serve as a false sense of security.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2015 | 8:24:41 AM
Security Suite versus Cost
The magic wand widget of 5 -10 years ago is a monumental security hole. But when it comes down to it, upgrading and purchasing new protections can become expensive quickly. Also pointed out in the article is that there needs to be a maintained human element, which may be scarce based on company resources.

I would recommend a solution that is managed by the same third party and has a security suite that encompasses the majority of prevalent security safeguards. In this way you will be able to reduce cost by coupling products, ensure cross system compatibility (which is huge for SIEM and other correlation), and upgrades can be managed more seamlessly. Also, if you company bandwidth is not large than an MSSP who focuses on this may also cut cost and increase security expertise for the organization.

Thoughts?


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Concerns over supply chain vulnerabilities and attack visibility drove some significant changes in enterprise cybersecurity strategies over the past year. Dark Reading's 2021 Strategic Security Survey showed that many organizations are staying the course regarding the use of a mix of attack prevention and threat detection technologies and practices for dealing with cyber threats.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-42258
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-22
BQE BillQuick Web Suite 2018 through 2021 before 22.0.9.1 allows SQL injection for unauthenticated remote code execution, as exploited in the wild in October 2021 for ransomware installation. SQL injection can, for example, use the txtID (aka username) parameter. Successful exploitation can include ...
CVE-2020-28968
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-22
Draytek VigorAP 1000C contains a stored cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the RADIUS Setting - RADIUS Server Configuration module. This vulnerability allows attackers to execute arbitrary web scripts or HTML via a crafted payload in the username input field.
CVE-2020-28969
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-22
Aplioxio PDF ShapingUp 5.0.0.139 contains a buffer overflow which allows attackers to cause a denial of service (DoS) via a crafted PDF file.
CVE-2020-36485
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-22
Portable Ltd Playable v9.18 was discovered to contain an arbitrary file upload vulnerability in the filename parameter of the upload module. This vulnerability allows attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted JPEG file.
CVE-2020-36486
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-22
Swift File Transfer Mobile v1.1.2 and below was discovered to contain a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability via the 'path' parameter of the 'list' and 'download' exception-handling.